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A habituation account of change detection in same/different judgments

Eddy J Davelaar, Xing Tian, Christoph Weidemann, David E Huber

Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, Volume: 11, Issue: 4, Pages: 608 - 626

Swansea University Author: Christoph Weidemann

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Abstract

We investigated the basis of change detection in a short-term priming task. In two experiments, participants were asked to indicate whether or not a target word was the same as a previously presented cue. Data from an experiment measuring magnetoencephalography failed to find different patterns for...

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Published in: Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience
ISSN: 1530-7026 1531-135X
Published: 2011
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6933
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spelling 2019-06-12T15:00:36.7644524 v2 6933 2012-01-28 A habituation account of change detection in same/different judgments b155eeefe08155214e70fea25649223c Christoph Weidemann Christoph Weidemann true false 2012-01-28 FGMHL We investigated the basis of change detection in a short-term priming task. In two experiments, participants were asked to indicate whether or not a target word was the same as a previously presented cue. Data from an experiment measuring magnetoencephalography failed to find different patterns for “same” and “different” responses, consistent with the claim that both arise from a common neural source, with response magnitude defining the difference between immediate novelty versus familiarity. In a behavioral experiment, we tested and confirmed the predictions of a habituation account of these judgments by comparing conditions in which the target, the cue, or neither was primed by its presentation in the previous trial. As predicted, cue-primed trials had faster response times, and target-primed trials had slower response times relative to the neither-primed baseline. These results were obtained irrespective of response repetition and stimulus–response contingencies. The behavioral and brain activity data support the view that detection of change drives performance in these tasks and that the underlying mechanism is neuronal habituation. Journal Article Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience 11 4 608 626 1530-7026 1531-135X 31 12 2011 2011-12-31 10.3758/s13415-011-0056-8 http://cogsci.info/papers/DavelaarEtAl2011.pdf COLLEGE NANME Medicine, Health and Life Science - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGMHL Swansea University 2019-06-12T15:00:36.7644524 2012-01-28T20:33:24.6730000 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Psychology Eddy J Davelaar 1 Xing Tian 2 Christoph Weidemann 3 David E Huber 4
title A habituation account of change detection in same/different judgments
spellingShingle A habituation account of change detection in same/different judgments
Christoph Weidemann
title_short A habituation account of change detection in same/different judgments
title_full A habituation account of change detection in same/different judgments
title_fullStr A habituation account of change detection in same/different judgments
title_full_unstemmed A habituation account of change detection in same/different judgments
title_sort A habituation account of change detection in same/different judgments
author_id_str_mv b155eeefe08155214e70fea25649223c
author_id_fullname_str_mv b155eeefe08155214e70fea25649223c_***_Christoph Weidemann
author Christoph Weidemann
author2 Eddy J Davelaar
Xing Tian
Christoph Weidemann
David E Huber
format Journal article
container_title Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience
container_volume 11
container_issue 4
container_start_page 608
publishDate 2011
institution Swansea University
issn 1530-7026
1531-135X
doi_str_mv 10.3758/s13415-011-0056-8
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Psychology{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Psychology
url http://cogsci.info/papers/DavelaarEtAl2011.pdf
document_store_str 0
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description We investigated the basis of change detection in a short-term priming task. In two experiments, participants were asked to indicate whether or not a target word was the same as a previously presented cue. Data from an experiment measuring magnetoencephalography failed to find different patterns for “same” and “different” responses, consistent with the claim that both arise from a common neural source, with response magnitude defining the difference between immediate novelty versus familiarity. In a behavioral experiment, we tested and confirmed the predictions of a habituation account of these judgments by comparing conditions in which the target, the cue, or neither was primed by its presentation in the previous trial. As predicted, cue-primed trials had faster response times, and target-primed trials had slower response times relative to the neither-primed baseline. These results were obtained irrespective of response repetition and stimulus–response contingencies. The behavioral and brain activity data support the view that detection of change drives performance in these tasks and that the underlying mechanism is neuronal habituation.
published_date 2011-12-31T03:08:34Z
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