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Turning Travel into 'Travail': Twenty-First-Century 'Voyageuses engagées' / Kathryn Jones

Nottingham French Studies, Volume: 52, Issue: 1, Pages: 24 - 43

Swansea University Author: Jones, Kathryn

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DOI (Published version): 10.3366/nfs.2013.0038

Abstract

This article examines attempts by contemporary female travellers to distance themselves from travel’s leisure and pleasure connotations by reasserting the ethical value of travel literature. In Bienvenue en Palestine (2004), Anne Brunswic bears witness to everyday life in Israeli-occupied Ramallah;...

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Published in: Nottingham French Studies
ISSN: 0029-4586 2047-7236
Published: 2013
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa807
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Abstract: This article examines attempts by contemporary female travellers to distance themselves from travel’s leisure and pleasure connotations by reasserting the ethical value of travel literature. In Bienvenue en Palestine (2004), Anne Brunswic bears witness to everyday life in Israeli-occupied Ramallah; and Soifs d’Orient and Méandres d’Asie (2008) describe the twenty-two-month journey by Caroline Riegel following ‘les pérégrinations d’une goutte d’eau en Asie’. These travel narratives by voyageuses engagées underline the potential of this undervalued literary genre to serve as a means of social critique and vehicle for raising awareness about key humanitarian and environmental issues. The article explores how the narrator-travellers inscribe the experience of travel with a sense of travail, not only through the global concerns they highlight and the war-torn conflict zones they visit, but also by deliberately depriving themselves of the comfort and ease of modern means of transport.
Keywords: Twenty-first-century travel literature, Anne Brunswic, Caroline Riegel, Palestine, environmental issues, ethical responsibility.
College: College of Arts and Humanities
Issue: 1
Start Page: 24
End Page: 43