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Beyond Consent? Paternalism and Pediatric Doping / Michael Mcnamee

Journal of the Philosphy of Sport, Volume: 36, Issue: 2, Pages: 111 - 126

Swansea University Author: McNamee, Michael

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Abstract

In this essay, I argue that the issue of pediatric/adolescent doping is one that merits serious philosophical attention. I consider whether an adolescent who is legally competent to consent to medical pharmacologies such as contraceptive pills ought to be allowed to consent to doping products. I fir...

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Published in: Journal of the Philosphy of Sport
ISSN: 0094-8705 1543-2939
Published: Champaign: IL Human Kinetics 2009
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa8983
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Abstract: In this essay, I argue that the issue of pediatric/adolescent doping is one that merits serious philosophical attention. I consider whether an adolescent who is legally competent to consent to medical pharmacologies such as contraceptive pills ought to be allowed to consent to doping products. I first discuss issues of vulnerability and exploitation of adolescent athletes that might underwrite a soft paternalistic response. I go on to argue that the harms attendant to doping, as opposed to the regulated use of the medical profession to prescribe oral contraceptives, are of a potentially greater magnitude to the successful adolescent patient/sportsperson themselves in contrast to therelatively well known risks of contraception. I also argue that the complexity of the weighing of potential harms and benefits are such that informed consent cannot be reached by adolescents. Moreover, given the public prominence of the WADA antidoping legislation, and the general public support for them, there will necessarily be a lack of transparency in the potential consent process, which undermines any audit for the accountability of the consent process. I conclude that Gillick competence ought not, therefore, to be viewed as a precedent for pediatric or adolescent consent to doping and that the “weak” or “soft” paternalistic prevention of doping is justified.
Item Description: This essay was first presented as the Distinguished Scholar award of the International Association for the Philosophy of Sport. It argues against liberalising anti doping policy and is novel in that it focuses on pedatric populations. The essay combines empirical data with ethical reflections to justify a paternalistic policy.
Keywords: consent, pediatric doping, sport
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 2
Start Page: 111
End Page: 126