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Molecular characterization of a subgroup IE intron with wide distribution in the large subunit rRNA genes of dermatophyte fungi

Colin J. Jackson, Richard C. Barton, C. Graham Clark, Steven Kelly Orcid Logo

Medical Mycology, Volume: 47, Issue: 6, Pages: 609 - 617

Swansea University Author: Steven Kelly Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Group I introns have the ability to catalyse their own excision (self-splice) from pre-RNA, and are found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms. In fungal nuclear genomes, they have been identified in the small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) of the ribosomal RNA gene. Sequencing of the 3�...

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Published in: Medical Mycology
ISSN: 1369-3786 1460-2709
Published: PARK SQUARE, MILTON PARK, ABINGDON OX14 4RN, OXON, ENGLAND Oxford University Press (OUP) 2009
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa10333
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spelling 2021-10-29T09:37:00.9919464 v2 10333 2012-03-21 Molecular characterization of a subgroup IE intron with wide distribution in the large subunit rRNA genes of dermatophyte fungi b17cebaf09b4d737b9378a3581e3de93 0000-0001-7991-5040 Steven Kelly Steven Kelly true false 2012-03-21 BMS Group I introns have the ability to catalyse their own excision (self-splice) from pre-RNA, and are found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms. In fungal nuclear genomes, they have been identified in the small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) of the ribosomal RNA gene. Sequencing of the 3' region of the LSU rRNA gene of the dermatophyte Trichophyton interdigitale revealed a 393 bp group I intron, Tin. 2563, containing the four characteristic conserved motifs (P, Q, R and S) essential for self-splicing. The predicted secondary structure revealed nine sets of conserved paired regions (P1-P9), with most similarity to a subgroup IE intron of the entomopathogenic hyphomycete Beauveria bassiana. Tin. 2563 was inserted at a site in the LSU rDNA corresponding to position 2563 of the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA. PCR and sequence analysis showed an intron to be present at an identical location in the LSU rDNA of many dermatophytes, although its distribution was erratic. In contrast, an intron was present at the same location in multiple isolates (n = 20) of the clinically important anthrophilic species Trichophyton rubrum and T. interdigitale. Conservation of intron insertion site, subgroup and P helix sequences showed intron genotyping to be unsuitable for strain identification in dermatophytes. Phylogenetic analysis of intron sequences from different dermatophyte species indicated that lateral transfer of the element was likely to be a rare event. Journal Article Medical Mycology 47 6 609 617 Oxford University Press (OUP) PARK SQUARE, MILTON PARK, ABINGDON OX14 4RN, OXON, ENGLAND 1369-3786 1460-2709 1 1 2009 2009-01-01 10.1080/13693780802385445 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Sciences COLLEGE CODE BMS Swansea University 2021-10-29T09:37:00.9919464 2012-03-21T16:17:29.0000000 Swansea University Medical School Medicine Colin J. Jackson 1 Richard C. Barton 2 C. Graham Clark 3 Steven Kelly 0000-0001-7991-5040 4
title Molecular characterization of a subgroup IE intron with wide distribution in the large subunit rRNA genes of dermatophyte fungi
spellingShingle Molecular characterization of a subgroup IE intron with wide distribution in the large subunit rRNA genes of dermatophyte fungi
Steven Kelly
title_short Molecular characterization of a subgroup IE intron with wide distribution in the large subunit rRNA genes of dermatophyte fungi
title_full Molecular characterization of a subgroup IE intron with wide distribution in the large subunit rRNA genes of dermatophyte fungi
title_fullStr Molecular characterization of a subgroup IE intron with wide distribution in the large subunit rRNA genes of dermatophyte fungi
title_full_unstemmed Molecular characterization of a subgroup IE intron with wide distribution in the large subunit rRNA genes of dermatophyte fungi
title_sort Molecular characterization of a subgroup IE intron with wide distribution in the large subunit rRNA genes of dermatophyte fungi
author_id_str_mv b17cebaf09b4d737b9378a3581e3de93
author_id_fullname_str_mv b17cebaf09b4d737b9378a3581e3de93_***_Steven Kelly
author Steven Kelly
author2 Colin J. Jackson
Richard C. Barton
C. Graham Clark
Steven Kelly
format Journal article
container_title Medical Mycology
container_volume 47
container_issue 6
container_start_page 609
publishDate 2009
institution Swansea University
issn 1369-3786
1460-2709
doi_str_mv 10.1080/13693780802385445
publisher Oxford University Press (OUP)
college_str Swansea University Medical School
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hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
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description Group I introns have the ability to catalyse their own excision (self-splice) from pre-RNA, and are found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms. In fungal nuclear genomes, they have been identified in the small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) of the ribosomal RNA gene. Sequencing of the 3' region of the LSU rRNA gene of the dermatophyte Trichophyton interdigitale revealed a 393 bp group I intron, Tin. 2563, containing the four characteristic conserved motifs (P, Q, R and S) essential for self-splicing. The predicted secondary structure revealed nine sets of conserved paired regions (P1-P9), with most similarity to a subgroup IE intron of the entomopathogenic hyphomycete Beauveria bassiana. Tin. 2563 was inserted at a site in the LSU rDNA corresponding to position 2563 of the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA. PCR and sequence analysis showed an intron to be present at an identical location in the LSU rDNA of many dermatophytes, although its distribution was erratic. In contrast, an intron was present at the same location in multiple isolates (n = 20) of the clinically important anthrophilic species Trichophyton rubrum and T. interdigitale. Conservation of intron insertion site, subgroup and P helix sequences showed intron genotyping to be unsuitable for strain identification in dermatophytes. Phylogenetic analysis of intron sequences from different dermatophyte species indicated that lateral transfer of the element was likely to be a rare event.
published_date 2009-01-01T03:19:17Z
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