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Effect of Capping Protein on a Growing Filopodium / D.R Daniels; Rob Daniels

Biophysical Journal, Volume: 98, Issue: 7, Pages: 1139 - 1148

Swansea University Author: Rob, Daniels

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Abstract

Title: Effect of Capping Protein on a Growing FilopodiumSource: BIOPHYSICAL JOURNAL Volume: 98 Issue: 7 Pages: 1139-1148 Published: APR 7 2010Abstract: Filopodia, or the growth of bundles of biological fibers outwards from a biological cell surface while enclosed in a membrane tube, are implicated i...

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Published in: Biophysical Journal
ISSN: 0006-3495
Published: 2010
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa10920
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Abstract: Title: Effect of Capping Protein on a Growing FilopodiumSource: BIOPHYSICAL JOURNAL Volume: 98 Issue: 7 Pages: 1139-1148 Published: APR 7 2010Abstract: Filopodia, or the growth of bundles of biological fibers outwards from a biological cell surface while enclosed in a membrane tube, are implicated in many processes vital to life. This study models the effect of capping protein on such filopodia, paying close attention to the polymerization dynamics of biological fiber bundles within long membrane tubes. Due to the effects of capping protein, the number of fibers in the filopodium bundle decreases down the length of the enclosing membrane tube. This decrease in the number of fibers down the length of a growing filopodium is found to have profound implications for the dynamics and stability of filopodia in general. This study theoretically finds that the presence of even a relatively modest amount of capping protein can have a large effect on the growth of typical filopodia, such as can be found in fibroblasts, keratocytes. and neuronal growth cones. As an illustration of this modeling work, this study investigates the striking example of the acrosomal reaction in the sea cucumber Thyone, whose filopodia can grow remarkably quickly to similar to 90 mu m in similar to 10 s, and where the number of fibers is known to decrease down the length of the filopodium, presumably due to progressive fiber end-capping occurring as the filopodium grows. Realistic future dynamical theories for filopodium growth are likely to rely on an accurate treatment of the kinds of capping protein effects analyzed in this work.Impact Factor: 4.683
Item Description: The dynamics and stability of long, thin, protrusions from cells (called filopodia) are critical for many processes vital to life. This work is important in that it describes theoretically for the first time the effect of capping protein on growing filopodia. Using this modelling work we are able to quantitatively fit experimental data on real filopdoia for the first time realistically. This work has therefore great significance for suggesting new possible therapeutic strategies for diseases caused by when filopodium dynamics runs amok.
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 7
Start Page: 1139
End Page: 1148