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Individual Differences in Subconscious Motor Control Predicted by GABA Concentration in SMA / Frederic Boy; C. John Evans; Richard A.E. Edden; Krish D. Singh; Masud Husain; Petroc Sumner

Current Biology, Volume: 20, Issue: 19, Pages: 1779 - 1785

Swansea University Author: Frederic, Boy

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Abstract

Subliminal visual stimuli affect motor planning [1], but the size of such effects differs greatly between individuals [2, 3]. Here, we investigated whether such variation may be related to neurochemical differences between people. Cortical responsiveness is expected to be lower under the influence o...

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Published in: Current Biology
ISSN: 0960-9822
Published: 2010
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa13373
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spelling 2015-06-16T12:44:47.4858772 v2 13373 2012-11-27 Individual Differences in Subconscious Motor Control Predicted by GABA Concentration in SMA 43e704698d5dbbac3734b7cd0fef60aa 0000-0003-1373-6634 Frederic Boy Frederic Boy true false 2012-11-27 BBU Subliminal visual stimuli affect motor planning [1], but the size of such effects differs greatly between individuals [2, 3]. Here, we investigated whether such variation may be related to neurochemical differences between people. Cortical responsiveness is expected to be lower under the influence of more of the main inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA [4]. Thus, we hypothesized that, if an individual has more GABA in the supplementary motor area (SMA)—a region previously associated with automatic motor control [5]—this would result in smaller subliminal effects. We measured the reversed masked prime—or negative compat- ibility—effect, and found that it correlated strongly with GABA concentration, measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This occurred specifically in the SMA region, and not in other regions from which spectroscopy measure- ments were taken. We replicated these results in an inde- pendent cohort: more GABA in the SMA region is reliably associated with smaller effect size. These findings suggest that, across individuals, the responsiveness of subcon- scious motor mechanisms is related to GABA concentration in the SMA. Journal Article Current Biology 20 19 1779 1785 0960-9822 GABA, Supplementary Motor Area, Individual differences 31 12 2010 2010-12-31 10.1016/j.cub.2010.09.003 COLLEGE NANME Business COLLEGE CODE BBU Swansea University 2015-06-16T12:44:47.4858772 2012-11-27T10:00:34.6516522 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Frederic Boy 0000-0003-1373-6634 1 C. John Evans 2 Richard A.E. Edden 3 Krish D. Singh 4 Masud Husain 5 Petroc Sumner 6
title Individual Differences in Subconscious Motor Control Predicted by GABA Concentration in SMA
spellingShingle Individual Differences in Subconscious Motor Control Predicted by GABA Concentration in SMA
Frederic, Boy
title_short Individual Differences in Subconscious Motor Control Predicted by GABA Concentration in SMA
title_full Individual Differences in Subconscious Motor Control Predicted by GABA Concentration in SMA
title_fullStr Individual Differences in Subconscious Motor Control Predicted by GABA Concentration in SMA
title_full_unstemmed Individual Differences in Subconscious Motor Control Predicted by GABA Concentration in SMA
title_sort Individual Differences in Subconscious Motor Control Predicted by GABA Concentration in SMA
author_id_str_mv 43e704698d5dbbac3734b7cd0fef60aa
author_id_fullname_str_mv 43e704698d5dbbac3734b7cd0fef60aa_***_Frederic, Boy
author Frederic, Boy
author2 Frederic Boy
C. John Evans
Richard A.E. Edden
Krish D. Singh
Masud Husain
Petroc Sumner
format Journal article
container_title Current Biology
container_volume 20
container_issue 19
container_start_page 1779
publishDate 2010
institution Swansea University
issn 0960-9822
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.cub.2010.09.003
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description Subliminal visual stimuli affect motor planning [1], but the size of such effects differs greatly between individuals [2, 3]. Here, we investigated whether such variation may be related to neurochemical differences between people. Cortical responsiveness is expected to be lower under the influence of more of the main inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA [4]. Thus, we hypothesized that, if an individual has more GABA in the supplementary motor area (SMA)—a region previously associated with automatic motor control [5]—this would result in smaller subliminal effects. We measured the reversed masked prime—or negative compat- ibility—effect, and found that it correlated strongly with GABA concentration, measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This occurred specifically in the SMA region, and not in other regions from which spectroscopy measure- ments were taken. We replicated these results in an inde- pendent cohort: more GABA in the SMA region is reliably associated with smaller effect size. These findings suggest that, across individuals, the responsiveness of subcon- scious motor mechanisms is related to GABA concentration in the SMA.
published_date 2010-12-31T03:25:43Z
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