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Medieval Amalfi and its Diaspora, 800-1250 / Patricia Skinner

Swansea University Author: Skinner, Patricia

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Abstract

The first English-language study of the history of medieval maritime republic of Amalfi. It addresses the internal political, social and economic history of Amalfi (as an independent city-state, under Norman rule and as part of the Kingdom of Sicily) and the history of its diaspora, those Amalfitans...

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Published: Oxford Oxford University Press 2013
Online Access: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199646272.do#.ULy47EYQORk
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa13426
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Abstract: The first English-language study of the history of medieval maritime republic of Amalfi. It addresses the internal political, social and economic history of Amalfi (as an independent city-state, under Norman rule and as part of the Kingdom of Sicily) and the history of its diaspora, those Amalfitans who left temporarily or permanently and whose activities contributed to the image of their home city as a thriving centre specialising in the luxury end of the market. The book argues that, instead of being seen in opposition to each other, the two strands of Amalfi's history should be treated as a whole, despite the very different evidence presented by the internal documentary archives and the narrative accounts of external observers. The book reconstructs the kinship ties which bound the emigrants to their home city. By taking a people-centred approach, that is, tracing individuals and their families, the study reveals the presence of Amalfitans in many parts of the Italian peninsula and further afield in the Mediterranean. At the same time, it critically re-examines previous historiography based on some of the externally-generated views of Amalfitan wealth, suggesting that the latter may have as much (or more) to do with literary and patronage networks as with the actual situation on the ground.
Keywords: Medieval Italy, Amalfi, trade, kinship, Mediterranean, communications, Byzantium, Islam, maritime republics, colonies, identity
College: College of Arts and Humanities