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Physician Burnout and Patient Satisfaction with Consultation in Primary Health Care Settings: Evidence of Relationships from a one-with-many Design / Julie, Slater

Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings

Swansea University Author: Julie, Slater

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Abstract

Physician burnout, as a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stressors on the job, has been associated with suboptimal patient care and deterioration in the patient-provider relationship. Although prior studies have identified a range of factors associated with decreased patient...

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Published in: Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
ISSN: 1068-9583 1573-3572
Published: 2011
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa13608
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Abstract: Physician burnout, as a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stressors on the job, has been associated with suboptimal patient care and deterioration in the patient-provider relationship. Although prior studies have identified a range of factors associated with decreased patient satisfaction, most have been conducted in tertiary care settings, while staff burnout has been examined at the hospital unit-level. To examine the impact of physician burnout on patient satisfaction from consultation in the primary care setting, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in Western Greece. Using a one-with-many design, 30 physicians and 300 of their patients, randomly selected, responded to the survey. Results showed that patient satisfaction correlated significantly with physician emotional exhaustion (r = -.636, p<.01) and physician depersonalization (r = -.541, p<.01). Mixed-effects multi-level models indicated that 34.4% of total variation in patients' satisfaction occurred at the physician level, after adjustment for patients' characteristics. Moreover, physician emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation remained significant factors associated with patient satisfaction with consultation, after controlling for patient and physician characteristics. Patients of physicians with high-exhaustion and high depersonalisation had significantly lower satisfaction scores, compared with patients of physicians with low-exhaustion and low depersonalisation, respectively. Future studies need to explore the mechanisms by which physician burnout affects patient satisfaction.
Keywords: Primary care, physician burnout, patient satisfaction, mixed effects, multilevel analysis
College: College of Human and Health Sciences