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Physician Burnout and Patient Satisfaction with Consultation in Primary Health Care Settings: Evidence of Relationships from a one-with-many Design / Julie, Slater

Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings

Swansea University Author: Julie, Slater

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Abstract

Physician burnout, as a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stressors on the job, has been associated with suboptimal patient care and deterioration in the patient-provider relationship. Although prior studies have identified a range of factors associated with decreased patient...

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Published in: Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
ISSN: 1068-9583 1573-3572
Published: 2011
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa13608
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spelling 2015-05-11T08:58:06.1828985 v2 13608 2012-12-10 Physician Burnout and Patient Satisfaction with Consultation in Primary Health Care Settings: Evidence of Relationships from a one-with-many Design e667e92452b25f96740ecf4f104b88f3 Julie Slater Julie Slater true false 2012-12-10 HIS Physician burnout, as a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stressors on the job, has been associated with suboptimal patient care and deterioration in the patient-provider relationship. Although prior studies have identified a range of factors associated with decreased patient satisfaction, most have been conducted in tertiary care settings, while staff burnout has been examined at the hospital unit-level. To examine the impact of physician burnout on patient satisfaction from consultation in the primary care setting, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in Western Greece. Using a one-with-many design, 30 physicians and 300 of their patients, randomly selected, responded to the survey. Results showed that patient satisfaction correlated significantly with physician emotional exhaustion (r = -.636, p&lt;.01) and physician depersonalization (r = -.541, p&lt;.01). Mixed-effects multi-level models indicated that 34.4% of total variation in patients&apos; satisfaction occurred at the physician level, after adjustment for patients&apos; characteristics. Moreover, physician emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation remained significant factors associated with patient satisfaction with consultation, after controlling for patient and physician characteristics. Patients of physicians with high-exhaustion and high depersonalisation had significantly lower satisfaction scores, compared with patients of physicians with low-exhaustion and low depersonalisation, respectively. Future studies need to explore the mechanisms by which physician burnout affects patient satisfaction. Journal Article Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings 1068-9583 1573-3572 Primary care, physician burnout, patient satisfaction, mixed effects, multilevel analysis 12 12 2011 2011-12-12 10.1007/s10880-011-9278-8 COLLEGE NANME Interprofessional Studies COLLEGE CODE HIS Swansea University 2015-05-11T08:58:06.1828985 2012-12-10T15:02:55.6508759 College of Human and Health Sciences Interprofessional Studies Fotios Anagnostopoulos 1 Evangelos Liolios 2 George Persefonis 3 Julie Slater 4 Kostas Kafetsios 5 Dimitris Niakas 6
title Physician Burnout and Patient Satisfaction with Consultation in Primary Health Care Settings: Evidence of Relationships from a one-with-many Design
spellingShingle Physician Burnout and Patient Satisfaction with Consultation in Primary Health Care Settings: Evidence of Relationships from a one-with-many Design
Julie, Slater
title_short Physician Burnout and Patient Satisfaction with Consultation in Primary Health Care Settings: Evidence of Relationships from a one-with-many Design
title_full Physician Burnout and Patient Satisfaction with Consultation in Primary Health Care Settings: Evidence of Relationships from a one-with-many Design
title_fullStr Physician Burnout and Patient Satisfaction with Consultation in Primary Health Care Settings: Evidence of Relationships from a one-with-many Design
title_full_unstemmed Physician Burnout and Patient Satisfaction with Consultation in Primary Health Care Settings: Evidence of Relationships from a one-with-many Design
title_sort Physician Burnout and Patient Satisfaction with Consultation in Primary Health Care Settings: Evidence of Relationships from a one-with-many Design
author_id_str_mv e667e92452b25f96740ecf4f104b88f3
author_id_fullname_str_mv e667e92452b25f96740ecf4f104b88f3_***_Julie, Slater
author Julie, Slater
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
publishDate 2011
institution Swansea University
issn 1068-9583
1573-3572
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s10880-011-9278-8
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Interprofessional Studies{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Interprofessional Studies
document_store_str 0
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description Physician burnout, as a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stressors on the job, has been associated with suboptimal patient care and deterioration in the patient-provider relationship. Although prior studies have identified a range of factors associated with decreased patient satisfaction, most have been conducted in tertiary care settings, while staff burnout has been examined at the hospital unit-level. To examine the impact of physician burnout on patient satisfaction from consultation in the primary care setting, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in Western Greece. Using a one-with-many design, 30 physicians and 300 of their patients, randomly selected, responded to the survey. Results showed that patient satisfaction correlated significantly with physician emotional exhaustion (r = -.636, p&lt;.01) and physician depersonalization (r = -.541, p&lt;.01). Mixed-effects multi-level models indicated that 34.4% of total variation in patients&apos; satisfaction occurred at the physician level, after adjustment for patients&apos; characteristics. Moreover, physician emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation remained significant factors associated with patient satisfaction with consultation, after controlling for patient and physician characteristics. Patients of physicians with high-exhaustion and high depersonalisation had significantly lower satisfaction scores, compared with patients of physicians with low-exhaustion and low depersonalisation, respectively. Future studies need to explore the mechanisms by which physician burnout affects patient satisfaction.
published_date 2011-12-12T13:26:13Z
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