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The Workflow of Computer-Assisted Translation Tools in Specialised Translation / Maria, Fernandez Parra

Reconceptualizing LSP: Online proceedings of the XVII European LSP Symposium 2009

Swansea University Author: Maria, Fernandez Parra

Abstract

It has been estimated that 90% of the translation work undertaken around the world is of a specialised nature (Byrne 2006: 2) and the demand for specialised translations shows no signs of diminishing. Therefore, it is not surprising that specialised translators are increasingly resorting to technolo...

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Published in: Reconceptualizing LSP: Online proceedings of the XVII European LSP Symposium 2009
Published: 2010
Online Access: http://bcom.au.dk/fileadmin/www.asb.dk/isek/fernandez-parra.pdf
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa13679
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Abstract: It has been estimated that 90% of the translation work undertaken around the world is of a specialised nature (Byrne 2006: 2) and the demand for specialised translations shows no signs of diminishing. Therefore, it is not surprising that specialised translators are increasingly resorting to technology, in particular to computer-assisted translation (CAT) tools, in order to cope with the demand (cf. Lönnroth 2008). The dramatic increase in the use of CAT tools has radically changed the work profile of specialised translators (Snell-Hornby 2006: 133) who no longer work in isolation. CAT tools are sophisticated software packages that support both individual work and teamwork, thus allowing even authors and experts to take part in the translation process. In this paper, I explore how the various features of CAT tools, such as translation memory, terminology management, etc., can be productively integrated into a specialised translation workflow, and how they allow networking between the different players, e.g. by providing a server-based interface where team members can instantly and remotely share all the data associated with a project, such as reference material, terminological data, etc. The aim of this paper is to raise awareness of the new ways in which specialised translations are produced and how translators cooperate through CAT tools in order to produce high-quality translations more quickly and efficiently whilst maintaining consistency. I also aim to show how new working methods have permanently changed the way we view the specialised translation process.References• Byrne, Jody. (2006) Technical Translation: Usability Strategies for Translating Technical Documentation. Dordrecht, Springer.• Lönnroth, Juhani. (2008) Language Technologies and the European Commission, LangTech, Language and Speech Technology Conference, Rome, 28-29 February 2008.• Snell-Hornby, Mary. (2006) Turns of Translation Studies: New Paradigms or Shifting Viewpoints?, Amsterdam, John Benjamin.
College: College of Arts and Humanities