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In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage / Ilyas M Khan; Lewis Francis; Peter S Theobald; Stefano Perni; Robert D Young; Polina Prokopovich; R. Steven Conlan; Charles W Archer

Biomaterials, Volume: 34, Issue: 5, Pages: 1478 - 1487

Swansea University Author: Khan, Ilyas

Abstract

Articular cartilage maturation is the postnatal development process that adapts joint surfaces to their site-specific biomechanical demands. Maturation involves gross morphological changes that occur through a process of synchronised growth and resorption of cartilage and generally ends at sexual ma...

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Published in: Biomaterials
ISSN: 0142-9612
Published: 2013
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa13945
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The inability to induce maturation in biomaterial constructs designed for cartilage repair has been cited as a major cause for their failure in producing persistent cell-based repair of joint lesions. The combination of growth factors FGF2 and TGF&#x3B2;1 induces accelerated articular cartilage maturation in vitro such that many molecular and morphological characteristics of tissue maturation are observable. We hypothesised that experimental growth factor-induced maturation of immature cartilage would result in a biophysical and biochemical composition consistent with a mature phenotype. Using native immature and mature cartilage as reference, we observed that growth factor-treated immature cartilages displayed increased nano-compressive stiffness, decreased surface adhesion, decreased water content, increased collagen content and smoother surfaces, correlating with a convergence to the mature cartilage phenotype. Furthermore, increased gene expression of surface structural protein collagen type I in growth factor-treated explants compared to reference cartilages demonstrates that they are still in the dynamic phase of the postnatal developmental transition. These data provide a basis for understanding the regulation of postnatal maturation of articular cartilage and the application of growth factor-induced maturation in vitro and in vivo in order to repair and regenerate cartilage defects.</abstract><type>Journal article</type><journal>Biomaterials</journal><volume>34</volume><journalNumber>5</journalNumber><paginationStart>1478</paginationStart><paginationEnd>1487</paginationEnd><publisher></publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>0142-9612</issnPrint><issnElectronic/><keywords>Cartilage, Maturation, FGF2, TGFb1, biomechanical</keywords><publishedDay>0</publishedDay><publishedMonth>2</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2013</publishedYear><publishedDate>2013-02-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.09.076</doi><url></url><notes>The work described in this study has led to an award of a grant of &#xA3;68,000 (18 months) to Dr I.M.Khan from Orthopaedic Research UK which is due to start in March 2013.</notes><college>Swansea University Medical School</college><department>Medicine</department><CollegeCode>CMED</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>PMSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><researchGroup>Devices</researchGroup><supervisor/><sponsorsfunders/><grantnumber/><degreelevel/><degreename>None</degreename><lastEdited>2019-07-10T12:13:19Z</lastEdited><Created>2013-01-21T16:52:44Z</Created><path><level id="1">Swansea University Medical School</level><level id="2">Medicine</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Ilyas M</firstname><surname>Khan</surname><orcid/><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Lewis</firstname><surname>Francis</surname><orcid/><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Peter S</firstname><surname>Theobald</surname><orcid/><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Stefano</firstname><surname>Perni</surname><orcid/><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Robert D</firstname><surname>Young</surname><orcid/><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Polina</firstname><surname>Prokopovich</surname><orcid/><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>R. 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spelling 2019-07-10T12:13:19Z v2 13945 2013-01-21 In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage Ilyas Khan Ilyas Khan true 0000-0002-3886-1987 false 2536d955ff70e7b77063a8efe9103161 3df2d4e694473d044744d12c702fba24 O8AaXfb/kO0Gte3TBYMZR9yvqZQRJmUl2lxhnzSZE7o= 2013-01-21 PMSC Articular cartilage maturation is the postnatal development process that adapts joint surfaces to their site-specific biomechanical demands. Maturation involves gross morphological changes that occur through a process of synchronised growth and resorption of cartilage and generally ends at sexual maturity. The inability to induce maturation in biomaterial constructs designed for cartilage repair has been cited as a major cause for their failure in producing persistent cell-based repair of joint lesions. The combination of growth factors FGF2 and TGFβ1 induces accelerated articular cartilage maturation in vitro such that many molecular and morphological characteristics of tissue maturation are observable. We hypothesised that experimental growth factor-induced maturation of immature cartilage would result in a biophysical and biochemical composition consistent with a mature phenotype. Using native immature and mature cartilage as reference, we observed that growth factor-treated immature cartilages displayed increased nano-compressive stiffness, decreased surface adhesion, decreased water content, increased collagen content and smoother surfaces, correlating with a convergence to the mature cartilage phenotype. Furthermore, increased gene expression of surface structural protein collagen type I in growth factor-treated explants compared to reference cartilages demonstrates that they are still in the dynamic phase of the postnatal developmental transition. These data provide a basis for understanding the regulation of postnatal maturation of articular cartilage and the application of growth factor-induced maturation in vitro and in vivo in order to repair and regenerate cartilage defects. Journal article Biomaterials 34 5 1478 1487 0142-9612 Cartilage, Maturation, FGF2, TGFb1, biomechanical 0 2 2013 2013-02-01 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.09.076 The work described in this study has led to an award of a grant of £68,000 (18 months) to Dr I.M.Khan from Orthopaedic Research UK which is due to start in March 2013. Swansea University Medical School Medicine CMED PMSC Swansea University Devices None 2019-07-10T12:13:19Z 2013-01-21T16:52:44Z Swansea University Medical School Medicine Ilyas M Khan 1 Lewis Francis 2 Peter S Theobald 3 Stefano Perni 4 Robert D Young 5 Polina Prokopovich 6 R. Steven Conlan 7 Charles W Archer 8 0013945-13062019160716.pdf InVitroGrowthFactorInducedBioEngineeringOfMatureArticularCartilage.pdf 2019-06-13T16:07:16Z Output 905321 application/pdf VoR true Published to Cronfa 10/07/2019 2019-06-13T00:00:00 true eng 0013945-19062019155018.pdf 13945.pdf 2019-06-19T15:50:18Z Output 1283267 application/pdf VoR true Published to Cronfa 19/06/2019 2019-06-18T00:00:00 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng
title In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage
spellingShingle In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage
Khan, Ilyas
title_short In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage
title_full In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage
title_fullStr In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage
title_full_unstemmed In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage
title_sort In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage
author_id_str_mv 2536d955ff70e7b77063a8efe9103161
author_id_fullname_str_mv 2536d955ff70e7b77063a8efe9103161_***_Khan, Ilyas
author Khan, Ilyas
author2 Ilyas M Khan
Lewis Francis
Peter S Theobald
Stefano Perni
Robert D Young
Polina Prokopovich
R. Steven Conlan
Charles W Archer
format Journal article
container_title Biomaterials
container_volume 34
container_issue 5
container_start_page 1478
publishDate 2013
institution Swansea University
issn 0142-9612
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.09.076
college_str Swansea University Medical School
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hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
document_store_str 1
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researchgroup_str Devices
description Articular cartilage maturation is the postnatal development process that adapts joint surfaces to their site-specific biomechanical demands. Maturation involves gross morphological changes that occur through a process of synchronised growth and resorption of cartilage and generally ends at sexual maturity. The inability to induce maturation in biomaterial constructs designed for cartilage repair has been cited as a major cause for their failure in producing persistent cell-based repair of joint lesions. The combination of growth factors FGF2 and TGFβ1 induces accelerated articular cartilage maturation in vitro such that many molecular and morphological characteristics of tissue maturation are observable. We hypothesised that experimental growth factor-induced maturation of immature cartilage would result in a biophysical and biochemical composition consistent with a mature phenotype. Using native immature and mature cartilage as reference, we observed that growth factor-treated immature cartilages displayed increased nano-compressive stiffness, decreased surface adhesion, decreased water content, increased collagen content and smoother surfaces, correlating with a convergence to the mature cartilage phenotype. Furthermore, increased gene expression of surface structural protein collagen type I in growth factor-treated explants compared to reference cartilages demonstrates that they are still in the dynamic phase of the postnatal developmental transition. These data provide a basis for understanding the regulation of postnatal maturation of articular cartilage and the application of growth factor-induced maturation in vitro and in vivo in order to repair and regenerate cartilage defects.
published_date 2013-02-01T20:35:11Z
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