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Keeping Up with the Murphys? Candidate Cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election / M. L Sudulich, M Wall, Matthew Wall

Parliamentary Affairs, Volume: 62, Issue: 3, Pages: 456 - 475

Swansea University Author: Matthew Wall

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DOI (Published version): 10.1093/pa/gsp008

Abstract

This article addresses the factors that influenced candidates' likelihood of cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election. It considers the roles of party affiliation and support as well as intra-party competition; candidates' monetary and political resources; and the marginality o...

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Published in: Parliamentary Affairs
ISSN: 0031-2290 1460-2482
Published: 2009
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa13946
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spelling 2013-09-17T15:39:40.8963991 v2 13946 2013-01-21 Keeping Up with the Murphys? Candidate Cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election 22914658d586a5759d4d4b945ea140bd 0000-0001-8265-4910 Matthew Wall Matthew Wall true false 2013-01-21 APC This article addresses the factors that influenced candidates' likelihood of cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election. It considers the roles of party affiliation and support as well as intra-party competition; candidates' monetary and political resources; and the marginality of the electoral race. The article also provides the first empirical test to date of whether candidates' decisions to cyber-campaign are influenced by the behaviour of their direct political opponents. Monetary resources, party affiliation and the behaviour of opponents are found to have statistically significant effects on the probability of a candidate conducting a cyber-campaign. Journal Article Parliamentary Affairs 62 3 456 475 0031-2290 1460-2482 31 12 2009 2009-12-31 10.1093/pa/gsp008 COLLEGE NANME Politics, Philosophy and International Relations COLLEGE CODE APC Swansea University 2013-09-17T15:39:40.8963991 2013-01-21T17:31:16.0926641 College of Arts and Humanities Political and Cultural Studies M. L Sudulich 1 M Wall 2 Matthew Wall 0000-0001-8265-4910 3
title Keeping Up with the Murphys? Candidate Cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election
spellingShingle Keeping Up with the Murphys? Candidate Cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election
Matthew, Wall
title_short Keeping Up with the Murphys? Candidate Cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election
title_full Keeping Up with the Murphys? Candidate Cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election
title_fullStr Keeping Up with the Murphys? Candidate Cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election
title_full_unstemmed Keeping Up with the Murphys? Candidate Cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election
title_sort Keeping Up with the Murphys? Candidate Cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election
author_id_str_mv 22914658d586a5759d4d4b945ea140bd
author_id_fullname_str_mv 22914658d586a5759d4d4b945ea140bd_***_Matthew, Wall
author Matthew, Wall
author2 M. L Sudulich
M Wall
Matthew Wall
format Journal article
container_title Parliamentary Affairs
container_volume 62
container_issue 3
container_start_page 456
publishDate 2009
institution Swansea University
issn 0031-2290
1460-2482
doi_str_mv 10.1093/pa/gsp008
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
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hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str Political and Cultural Studies{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}Political and Cultural Studies
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description This article addresses the factors that influenced candidates' likelihood of cyber-campaigning in the 2007 Irish General Election. It considers the roles of party affiliation and support as well as intra-party competition; candidates' monetary and political resources; and the marginality of the electoral race. The article also provides the first empirical test to date of whether candidates' decisions to cyber-campaign are influenced by the behaviour of their direct political opponents. Monetary resources, party affiliation and the behaviour of opponents are found to have statistically significant effects on the probability of a candidate conducting a cyber-campaign.
published_date 2009-12-31T03:29:03Z
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