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And the Last Shall Be First: Heterochrony and Compensatory Marine Growth in Sea Trout (Salmo trutta) / Francisco Marco-Rius, Pablo Caballero, Paloma Morán, Carlos Garcia De Leaniz

PLoS ONE, Volume: 7, Issue: 10, Start page: e45528

Swansea University Author: Carlos Garcia De Leaniz

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Abstract

Early juvenile growth is a good indicator of growth later in life in many species because larger than average juveniles tend to have a competitive advantage. However, for migratory species the relationship between juvenile and adult growth remains obscure. We used scale analysis to reconstruct growt...

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Published in: PLoS ONE
ISSN: 1932-6203
Published: 2012
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa14067
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spelling 2016-09-07T14:42:17.4800301 v2 14067 2013-01-25 And the Last Shall Be First: Heterochrony and Compensatory Marine Growth in Sea Trout (Salmo trutta) 1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02 0000-0003-1650-2729 Carlos Garcia De Leaniz Carlos Garcia De Leaniz true false 2013-01-25 SBI Early juvenile growth is a good indicator of growth later in life in many species because larger than average juveniles tend to have a competitive advantage. However, for migratory species the relationship between juvenile and adult growth remains obscure. We used scale analysis to reconstruct growth trajectories of migratory sea trout (Salmo trutta) from six neighbouring populations, and compared the size individuals attained in freshwater (before migration) with their subsequent growth at sea (after migration). We also calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) to examine how much body size varied across populations and life stages. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that the CV on body size would differ between freshwater and marine environment, perhaps reflecting different trade-offs during ontogeny. Neighbouring sea trout populations differed significantly in time spent at sea and in age-adjusted size of returning adults, but not on size of seaward migration, which was surprisingly uniform and may be indicative of strong selection pressures. The CV on body size decreased significantly over time and was highest during the first 8 months of life (when juvenile mortality is highest) and lowest during the marine phase. Size attained in freshwater was negatively related to growth during the first marine growing season, suggesting the existence of compensatory growth, whereby individuals that grow poorly in freshwater are able to catch up later at sea. Analysis of 61 datasets indicates that negative or no associations between pre- and post-migratory growth are common amongst migratory salmonids. We suggest that despite a widespread selective advantage of large body size in freshwater, freshwater growth is a poor predictor of final body size amongst migratory fish because selection may favour growth heterochrony during transitions to a novel environment, and marine compensatory growth may negate any initial size advantage acquired in freshwater. Journal Article PLoS ONE 7 10 e45528 1932-6203 31 12 2012 2012-12-31 10.1371/journal.pone.0045528 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2016-09-07T14:42:17.4800301 2013-01-25T12:08:42.5312801 College of Science Biosciences Francisco Marco-Rius 1 Pablo Caballero 2 Paloma Morán 3 Carlos Garcia De Leaniz 0000-0003-1650-2729 4
title And the Last Shall Be First: Heterochrony and Compensatory Marine Growth in Sea Trout (Salmo trutta)
spellingShingle And the Last Shall Be First: Heterochrony and Compensatory Marine Growth in Sea Trout (Salmo trutta)
Carlos, Garcia De Leaniz
title_short And the Last Shall Be First: Heterochrony and Compensatory Marine Growth in Sea Trout (Salmo trutta)
title_full And the Last Shall Be First: Heterochrony and Compensatory Marine Growth in Sea Trout (Salmo trutta)
title_fullStr And the Last Shall Be First: Heterochrony and Compensatory Marine Growth in Sea Trout (Salmo trutta)
title_full_unstemmed And the Last Shall Be First: Heterochrony and Compensatory Marine Growth in Sea Trout (Salmo trutta)
title_sort And the Last Shall Be First: Heterochrony and Compensatory Marine Growth in Sea Trout (Salmo trutta)
author_id_str_mv 1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02
author_id_fullname_str_mv 1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02_***_Carlos, Garcia De Leaniz
author Carlos, Garcia De Leaniz
author2 Francisco Marco-Rius
Pablo Caballero
Paloma Morán
Carlos Garcia De Leaniz
format Journal article
container_title PLoS ONE
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container_issue 10
container_start_page e45528
publishDate 2012
institution Swansea University
issn 1932-6203
doi_str_mv 10.1371/journal.pone.0045528
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
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description Early juvenile growth is a good indicator of growth later in life in many species because larger than average juveniles tend to have a competitive advantage. However, for migratory species the relationship between juvenile and adult growth remains obscure. We used scale analysis to reconstruct growth trajectories of migratory sea trout (Salmo trutta) from six neighbouring populations, and compared the size individuals attained in freshwater (before migration) with their subsequent growth at sea (after migration). We also calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) to examine how much body size varied across populations and life stages. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that the CV on body size would differ between freshwater and marine environment, perhaps reflecting different trade-offs during ontogeny. Neighbouring sea trout populations differed significantly in time spent at sea and in age-adjusted size of returning adults, but not on size of seaward migration, which was surprisingly uniform and may be indicative of strong selection pressures. The CV on body size decreased significantly over time and was highest during the first 8 months of life (when juvenile mortality is highest) and lowest during the marine phase. Size attained in freshwater was negatively related to growth during the first marine growing season, suggesting the existence of compensatory growth, whereby individuals that grow poorly in freshwater are able to catch up later at sea. Analysis of 61 datasets indicates that negative or no associations between pre- and post-migratory growth are common amongst migratory salmonids. We suggest that despite a widespread selective advantage of large body size in freshwater, freshwater growth is a poor predictor of final body size amongst migratory fish because selection may favour growth heterochrony during transitions to a novel environment, and marine compensatory growth may negate any initial size advantage acquired in freshwater.
published_date 2012-12-31T03:23:50Z
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