No Cover Image

Journal article 306 views 65 downloads

A new high‐resolution melt curve eDNA assay to monitor the simultaneous presence of invasive brown trout ( <i>Salmo trutta</i> ) and endangered galaxiids

Jessica Minett, Carlos Garcia De Leaniz Orcid Logo, Paul Brickle Orcid Logo, S Consuegra del Olmo Orcid Logo

Environmental DNA, Volume: 3, Issue: 3, Pages: 561 - 572

Swansea University Authors: Jessica Minett, Carlos Garcia De Leaniz Orcid Logo, S Consuegra del Olmo Orcid Logo

  • 56109.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    © 2020 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

    Download (1.33MB)

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.1002/edn3.151

Abstract

Brown trout are highly invasive in the Southern Hemisphere where they support important sport fisheries and aquaculture activities, which may impact endangered native galaxiid fishes and cause conflicts. To protect native galaxiids it is essential to monitor changes in species distributions, but thi...

Full description

Published in: Environmental DNA
ISSN: 2637-4943 2637-4943
Published: Wiley 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56109
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Brown trout are highly invasive in the Southern Hemisphere where they support important sport fisheries and aquaculture activities, which may impact endangered native galaxiid fishes and cause conflicts. To protect native galaxiids it is essential to monitor changes in species distributions, but this can be difficult when species are rare or difficult to sample. We developed and validated, both in the laboratory and in the field, a new assay using a high-resolution melt curve (HRM)-eDNA approach to simultaneously detect the presence of two threatened native galaxiids (Aplochiton zebra and Aplochiton taeniatus) and the invasive brown trout (Salmo trutta). Using this method, we found brown trout in 30% of the sampled waterbodies and Aplochiton sp. in 15% of them. Galaxiids were solely identified as being present in rivers that lacked brown trout, with both native species coexisting in two of the three rivers where they were detected, despite their different niche preferences. These assays can be used to monitor threatened zebra trout as well as invasive brown trout populations, allowing conservation managers to target areas for intervention.
Keywords: Aplochiton taeniatus; Aplochiton zebra; endemic fishes; high‐resolution melt curve; invasive species; qPCR‐HRM
College: College of Science
Funders: Fortuna Ltd; Swansea University
Issue: 3
Start Page: 561
End Page: 572