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Lost in translation: problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport / Geoff Dudley; Phil Goodwin; Glenn Lyons; Charles Musselwhite; Peter Wiltshire

Transportation Planning and Technology, Volume: 34, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Musselwhite, Charles

Abstract

This paper reviews available UK evidence on (private sector) business attitudes to transport. It follows a 2008 review of public attitudes to transport, and provides an important frame of reference for considering business attitudes. Accordingly the current paper includes comparisons between public...

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Published in: Transportation Planning and Technology
ISSN: 0308-1060 1029-0354
Published: 2011
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa14670
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spelling 2019-06-14T11:43:03Z v2 14670 2013-04-23 Lost in translation: problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport Charles Musselwhite Charles Musselwhite true 0000-0002-4831-2092 false c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c 75beebc8067424cc969d67472c4466a7 InStp5CuNrzTiXll2RhycFI/4mL4zIy/GXDlPjHD2Zg= 2013-04-23 HIA This paper reviews available UK evidence on (private sector) business attitudes to transport. It follows a 2008 review of public attitudes to transport, and provides an important frame of reference for considering business attitudes. Accordingly the current paper includes comparisons between public and business attitudes. There are some prima facie similarities between public and business attitudes in relation to congestion, the order of importance of transport attributes (especially reliability), stated conditions for support of road pricing, public transport, travel plans, telecommunications and some issues of reducing travel. There are, however, some differences also: transport concerns are less ubiquitous, less attention is given to the environmental concerns associated with road building and there is less attention to wider government goals such as equity, health, social welfare and the environment. However, both similarities and differences may be misleading, as research on business attitudes is less disciplined, and there are no well-established theoretical frameworks (such as exist for individual attitudes) for understanding attitudes, when applied to the corporate views of a commercial body. In essence, many of the business attitudes reports are framed as lobbying material yet, paradoxically, there can be considerable ambiguity attached to the meanings of business attitudes, that in turn can be partially attributed to doubts as to whether responses represent individual or corporate attitudes. As a result, it is very difficult, from the existing evidence, to interpret a clear and coherent view or set of views of business on transport issues. The authors suggest some protocols, with the aim of improving research methods that, if implemented, could help improve the credibility and clarity of claims to represent the ‘voice (or, more realistically, voices) of business’. Journal article Transportation Planning and Technology 34 1 50 0308-1060 1029-0354 business, attitudes, methodology, interpretation 0 1 2011 2011-01-01 10.1080/03081060.2011.530828 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03081060.2011.530828#tabModule College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing CHHS HIA Swansea University Centre for Innovative Ageing None 2019-06-14T11:43:03Z 2013-04-23T15:36:03Z College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing Geoff Dudley 1 Phil Goodwin 2 Glenn Lyons 3 Charles Musselwhite 4 Peter Wiltshire 5 0014670-21122017131308.pdf 14760.pdf 2017-12-21T13:13:08Z Output 788056 application/pdf AM true Updated Copyright 05/02/2018 2013-04-23T00:00:00 true eng
title Lost in translation: problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport
spellingShingle Lost in translation: problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport
Musselwhite, Charles
title_short Lost in translation: problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport
title_full Lost in translation: problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport
title_fullStr Lost in translation: problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport
title_full_unstemmed Lost in translation: problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport
title_sort Lost in translation: problems in interpreting business attitudes to transport
author_id_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c
author_id_fullname_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c_***_Musselwhite, Charles
author Musselwhite, Charles
author2 Geoff Dudley
Phil Goodwin
Glenn Lyons
Charles Musselwhite
Peter Wiltshire
format Journal article
container_title Transportation Planning and Technology
container_volume 34
container_issue 1
publishDate 2011
institution Swansea University
issn 0308-1060
1029-0354
doi_str_mv 10.1080/03081060.2011.530828
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Centre for Innovative Ageing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Centre for Innovative Ageing
url http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03081060.2011.530828#tabModule
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researchgroup_str Centre for Innovative Ageing
description This paper reviews available UK evidence on (private sector) business attitudes to transport. It follows a 2008 review of public attitudes to transport, and provides an important frame of reference for considering business attitudes. Accordingly the current paper includes comparisons between public and business attitudes. There are some prima facie similarities between public and business attitudes in relation to congestion, the order of importance of transport attributes (especially reliability), stated conditions for support of road pricing, public transport, travel plans, telecommunications and some issues of reducing travel. There are, however, some differences also: transport concerns are less ubiquitous, less attention is given to the environmental concerns associated with road building and there is less attention to wider government goals such as equity, health, social welfare and the environment. However, both similarities and differences may be misleading, as research on business attitudes is less disciplined, and there are no well-established theoretical frameworks (such as exist for individual attitudes) for understanding attitudes, when applied to the corporate views of a commercial body. In essence, many of the business attitudes reports are framed as lobbying material yet, paradoxically, there can be considerable ambiguity attached to the meanings of business attitudes, that in turn can be partially attributed to doubts as to whether responses represent individual or corporate attitudes. As a result, it is very difficult, from the existing evidence, to interpret a clear and coherent view or set of views of business on transport issues. The authors suggest some protocols, with the aim of improving research methods that, if implemented, could help improve the credibility and clarity of claims to represent the ‘voice (or, more realistically, voices) of business’.
published_date 2011-01-01T15:00:44Z
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