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Influence of training status and maturity on pulmonary O2 uptake recovery kinetics following cycle and upper body exercise in girls

Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

Pediatric Exercise Science, Volume: 24, Issue: 2

Swansea University Author: Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

Abstract

The influence of training status on pulmonary VO2 recovery kinetics, and its interaction with maturity, has not been investigated in young girls. Sixteen prepubertal (Pre: trained (T, 11.4 ± 0.7 years), 8 untrained (UT, 11.5 ± 0.6 years)) and 8 pubertal (Pub: 8T, 14.2 ± 0.7 years; 8 UT, 14.5 ± 1.3 y...

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Published in: Pediatric Exercise Science
Published: 2012
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa14730
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2017-12-20T14:18:22.7230552</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>14730</id><entry>2013-04-24</entry><title>Influence of training status and maturity on pulmonary O2 uptake recovery kinetics following cycle and upper body exercise in girls</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0813-7477</ORCID><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><name>Melitta McNarry</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2013-04-24</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>The influence of training status on pulmonary VO2 recovery kinetics, and its interaction with maturity, has not been investigated in young girls. Sixteen prepubertal (Pre: trained (T, 11.4 &#xB1; 0.7 years), 8 untrained (UT, 11.5 &#xB1; 0.6 years)) and 8 pubertal (Pub: 8T, 14.2 &#xB1; 0.7 years; 8 UT, 14.5 &#xB1; 1.3 years) girls completed repeat transitions from heavy intensity exercise to a baseline of unloaded exercise, on both an upper and lower body ergometer. The VO2 recovery time constant was significantly shorter in the trained prepubertal and pubertal girls during both cycle (Pre: T, 26 &#xB1; 4 vs. UT, 32 &#xB1; 6; Pub: T, 28 &#xB1; 2 vs. UT, 35 &#xB1; 7 s; both p &lt; .05) and upper body exercise (Pre: T, 26 &#xB1; 4 vs. UT, 35 &#xB1; 6; Pub: T, 30 &#xB1; 4 vs. UT, 42 &#xB1; 3 s; both p &lt; .05). No interaction was evident between training status and maturity. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of VO2 recovery kinetics to training in young girls and challenge the notion of a &#x201C;maturational threshold&#x201D; in the influence of training status on the physiological responses to exercise and recovery.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Pediatric Exercise Science</journal><volume>24</volume><journalNumber>2</journalNumber><paginationStart/><paginationEnd>261</paginationEnd><publisher/><placeOfPublication/><issnPrint/><issnElectronic/><keywords/><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>12</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2012</publishedYear><publishedDate>2012-12-31</publishedDate><doi/><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2017-12-20T14:18:22.7230552</lastEdited><Created>2013-04-24T14:13:51.5699521</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0813-7477</orcid><order>1</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0014730-20122017141547.pdf</filename><originalFilename>14730.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2017-12-20T14:15:47.3870000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>887640</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2016-03-29T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2017-12-20T14:18:22.7230552 v2 14730 2013-04-24 Influence of training status and maturity on pulmonary O2 uptake recovery kinetics following cycle and upper body exercise in girls 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false 2013-04-24 STSC The influence of training status on pulmonary VO2 recovery kinetics, and its interaction with maturity, has not been investigated in young girls. Sixteen prepubertal (Pre: trained (T, 11.4 ± 0.7 years), 8 untrained (UT, 11.5 ± 0.6 years)) and 8 pubertal (Pub: 8T, 14.2 ± 0.7 years; 8 UT, 14.5 ± 1.3 years) girls completed repeat transitions from heavy intensity exercise to a baseline of unloaded exercise, on both an upper and lower body ergometer. The VO2 recovery time constant was significantly shorter in the trained prepubertal and pubertal girls during both cycle (Pre: T, 26 ± 4 vs. UT, 32 ± 6; Pub: T, 28 ± 2 vs. UT, 35 ± 7 s; both p < .05) and upper body exercise (Pre: T, 26 ± 4 vs. UT, 35 ± 6; Pub: T, 30 ± 4 vs. UT, 42 ± 3 s; both p < .05). No interaction was evident between training status and maturity. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of VO2 recovery kinetics to training in young girls and challenge the notion of a “maturational threshold” in the influence of training status on the physiological responses to exercise and recovery. Journal Article Pediatric Exercise Science 24 2 261 31 12 2012 2012-12-31 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2017-12-20T14:18:22.7230552 2013-04-24T14:13:51.5699521 College of Engineering Engineering Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 1 0014730-20122017141547.pdf 14730.pdf 2017-12-20T14:15:47.3870000 Output 887640 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2016-03-29T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Influence of training status and maturity on pulmonary O2 uptake recovery kinetics following cycle and upper body exercise in girls
spellingShingle Influence of training status and maturity on pulmonary O2 uptake recovery kinetics following cycle and upper body exercise in girls
Melitta McNarry
title_short Influence of training status and maturity on pulmonary O2 uptake recovery kinetics following cycle and upper body exercise in girls
title_full Influence of training status and maturity on pulmonary O2 uptake recovery kinetics following cycle and upper body exercise in girls
title_fullStr Influence of training status and maturity on pulmonary O2 uptake recovery kinetics following cycle and upper body exercise in girls
title_full_unstemmed Influence of training status and maturity on pulmonary O2 uptake recovery kinetics following cycle and upper body exercise in girls
title_sort Influence of training status and maturity on pulmonary O2 uptake recovery kinetics following cycle and upper body exercise in girls
author_id_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
author_id_fullname_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta McNarry
author Melitta McNarry
author2 Melitta McNarry
format Journal article
container_title Pediatric Exercise Science
container_volume 24
container_issue 2
publishDate 2012
institution Swansea University
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
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description The influence of training status on pulmonary VO2 recovery kinetics, and its interaction with maturity, has not been investigated in young girls. Sixteen prepubertal (Pre: trained (T, 11.4 ± 0.7 years), 8 untrained (UT, 11.5 ± 0.6 years)) and 8 pubertal (Pub: 8T, 14.2 ± 0.7 years; 8 UT, 14.5 ± 1.3 years) girls completed repeat transitions from heavy intensity exercise to a baseline of unloaded exercise, on both an upper and lower body ergometer. The VO2 recovery time constant was significantly shorter in the trained prepubertal and pubertal girls during both cycle (Pre: T, 26 ± 4 vs. UT, 32 ± 6; Pub: T, 28 ± 2 vs. UT, 35 ± 7 s; both p < .05) and upper body exercise (Pre: T, 26 ± 4 vs. UT, 35 ± 6; Pub: T, 30 ± 4 vs. UT, 42 ± 3 s; both p < .05). No interaction was evident between training status and maturity. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of VO2 recovery kinetics to training in young girls and challenge the notion of a “maturational threshold” in the influence of training status on the physiological responses to exercise and recovery.
published_date 2012-12-31T03:24:22Z
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