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Dissociating mechanisms involved in accessing identity by dynamic and static cues. / Leslie L Steede; Jeremy Tree; Graham J Hole

Visual Cognition, Volume: 15, Issue: 1, Pages: 116 - 119

Swansea University Author: Jeremy, Tree

Abstract

Research indicates that idiosyncratic facial and bodily movements can provide useful cues for recovering person identity. Across four experiments, two developmental prosopagnosics (CS and AA) as well as control groups, were tested. In Experiments 1 and 2, CS was tested on his ability to discriminate...

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Published in: Visual Cognition
Published: 2007
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa16868
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Abstract: Research indicates that idiosyncratic facial and bodily movements can provide useful cues for recovering person identity. Across four experiments, two developmental prosopagnosics (CS and AA) as well as control groups, were tested. In Experiments 1 and 2, CS was tested on his ability to discriminate and learn to name identities by their idiosyncratic facial movements. In Experiments 4 and 5, A A completed two different tasks which tested his ability to learn to recognize identities by their idiosyncratic facial and bodily movements. In Experiments 1-3, we used a variant of a task to determine whether CS could discriminate between identities on the basis of their idiosyncratic facial movements. In Experiments 4-6, we tested whether AA could learn to recognize five identities on the basis of their idiosyncratic facial (Experiment 4) and bodily movements (Experiment 5). Taken together, the results of these experiments suggest that the mechanisms involved in accessing identity by dynamic facial and bodily movements, are likely to be different to those involved in static face recognition. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Keywords: prosopagnosia
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 1
Start Page: 116
End Page: 119