No Cover Image

Journal article 566 views

“Deep” language disorders in nonfluent progressive Aphasia: an evaluation of the “summation” account of semantic errors across language production tasks / Jeremy Tree; Janice Kay; Timothy J Perfect

Cognitive Neuropsychology, Volume: 22, Issue: 6, Pages: 643 - 659

Swansea University Author: Jeremy, Tree

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

DOI (Published version): 10.1080/02643290442000220

Abstract

This study focuses on the pattern of impairments seen in a new case KT, diagnosed with non- fluent progressive aphasia (NFPA), a degenerative disorder of language production. A systematic examination of KT’s performance on a wide range of language production tasks (i.e., repetition, reading, spellin...

Full description

Published in: Cognitive Neuropsychology
Published: 2005
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa16872
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: This study focuses on the pattern of impairments seen in a new case KT, diagnosed with non- fluent progressive aphasia (NFPA), a degenerative disorder of language production. A systematic examination of KT’s performance on a wide range of language production tasks (i.e., repetition, reading, spelling, spoken and written naming) determined that both written naming and repetition were better preserved than reading, spelling-to-dictation, and spoken naming. Closer examination of error performance in both reading aloud and written production revealed evidence of “deep dyslexia” and “deep dysgraphia” that has not been documented in previous cases of NFPA, and as such the present case represents the first detailed case study of this pattern of impairment in the context of progressive aphasia. An evaluation and discussion of such deep language impair- ment disorders in the context of other cases of NFPA has been undertaken with reference to the summation hypothesis proposed by Hillis and Caramazza (1991, 1995). It is suggested that as a principle that holds across all language production tasks, this account can encompass patterns of deep disorders thus far reported in NFPA, although other theoretical hypotheses cannot be excluded.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 6
Start Page: 643
End Page: 659