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Deep Dysphasic Performance in Non-fluent Progressive Aphasia: a Case Study / J. J Tree; Jeremy Tree

Neurocase, Volume: 7, Issue: 6, Pages: 473 - 488

Swansea University Author: Jeremy, Tree

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DOI (Published version): 10.1093/neucas/7.6.473

Abstract

We present a patient (PW) with non-fluent progressive aphasia, characterized by severe word finding difficulties and frequent phonemic paraphasias in spontaneous speech. It has been suggested that such patients have insufficient access to phonological information for output and cannot construct the...

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Published in: Neurocase
Published: 2001
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa16877
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Abstract: We present a patient (PW) with non-fluent progressive aphasia, characterized by severe word finding difficulties and frequent phonemic paraphasias in spontaneous speech. It has been suggested that such patients have insufficient access to phonological information for output and cannot construct the appropriate sequence of selected phonemes for articulation. Consistent with such a proposal, we found that PW was impaired on a variety of verbal tasks that demand access to phonological representations (reading, repetition, confrontational naming and rhyme judgement); she also demonstrated poor performance on syntactic and grammatical processing tasks. However, examination of PW’s repetition performance also revealed that she made semantic paraphasias and that her performance was influenced by imageability and lexical status. Her auditory-verbal short-term memory was also severely compromised. These features are consistent with ‘deep dysphasia’, a disorder reported in patients suffering from stroke or cerebrovascular accident, and rarely reported in the context of non-fluent progressive aphasia. PW’s pattern of performance is evaluated in terms of current models of both non-fluent progressive aphasia and deep dysphasia.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 6
Start Page: 473
End Page: 488