No Cover Image

Book chapter 786 views

Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society / Judith, Phillips; Charles, Musselwhite

Countryside Connections: Older people, Community and Place in Rural Britain.

Swansesa University Authors: Judith, Phillips, Charles, Musselwhite

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

Abstract

The chapter argues for an understanding of connectivity through mobility by elders living in rural areas that goes beyond the traditional transport planning focus on the supply and demand of transport services. This involves consideration of not just physical movement but also all the other ways in...

Full description

Published in: Countryside Connections: Older people, Community and Place in Rural Britain.
Published: Policy Press Scholarship Online 2014
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa17932
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: The chapter argues for an understanding of connectivity through mobility by elders living in rural areas that goes beyond the traditional transport planning focus on the supply and demand of transport services. This involves consideration of not just physical movement but also all the other ways in which older people can be ‘mobile’ for connectivity and the wider benefits and meanings mobility brings, for example video-calling grandchildren using computer software, finding out about shopping delivery services for use in bad weather, or compiling a scrapbook about a past alpine holiday. Following a brief review of methods, a conceptual framework for mobility which can be applied across the lifecourse is presented. The following section applies this framework as context to understanding some of the key mobility policy and practice challenges for the promotion of connectivity of rural elders, which relate to the availability of mobility options - cars in particular - and the associated issues of accessibility and mobility-linked social exclusion. It is concluded that the more holistic appraisal of mobility for older citizens bring important conceptual benefits. A picture of rural areas being more car intensive but less car dependent than identified in previous studies emerges, with accessibility for connectivity also relatively unproblematic. Practical relevance is drawn out for planning and urban design as well as for health and social care professionals.
Keywords: Rural, transport, connectivity, giving up driving, health, wellbeing, volunteering, social isolation
College: College of Human and Health Sciences