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Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society / Judith, Phillips; Charles, Musselwhite

Countryside Connections: Older people, Community and Place in Rural Britain.

Swansesa University Authors: Judith, Phillips, Charles, Musselwhite

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Abstract

The chapter argues for an understanding of connectivity through mobility by elders living in rural areas that goes beyond the traditional transport planning focus on the supply and demand of transport services. This involves consideration of not just physical movement but also all the other ways in...

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Published in: Countryside Connections: Older people, Community and Place in Rural Britain.
Published: Policy Press Scholarship Online 2014
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa17932
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-07-01T16:32:09.1558358</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>17932</id><entry>2014-05-06</entry><title>Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>db24d12db193b13c183004bdd2b91660</sid><ORCID/><firstname>Judith</firstname><surname>Phillips</surname><name>Judith Phillips</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-4831-2092</ORCID><firstname>Charles</firstname><surname>Musselwhite</surname><name>Charles Musselwhite</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2014-05-06</date><deptcode>HIA</deptcode><abstract>The chapter argues for an understanding of connectivity through mobility by elders living in rural areas that goes beyond the traditional transport planning focus on the supply and demand of transport services. This involves consideration of not just physical movement but also all the other ways in which older people can be &#x2018;mobile&#x2019; for connectivity and the wider benefits and meanings mobility brings, for example video-calling grandchildren using computer software, finding out about shopping delivery services for use in bad weather, or compiling a scrapbook about a past alpine holiday. Following a brief review of methods, a conceptual framework for mobility which can be applied across the lifecourse is presented. The following section applies this framework as context to understanding some of the key mobility policy and practice challenges for the promotion of connectivity of rural elders, which relate to the availability of mobility options - cars in particular - and the associated issues of accessibility and mobility-linked social exclusion. It is concluded that the more holistic appraisal of mobility for older citizens bring important conceptual benefits. A picture of rural areas being more car intensive but less car dependent than identified in previous studies emerges, with accessibility for connectivity also relatively unproblematic. Practical relevance is drawn out for planning and urban design as well as for health and social care professionals.</abstract><type>Book chapter</type><journal>Countryside Connections: Older people, Community and Place in Rural Britain.</journal><publisher>Policy Press Scholarship Online</publisher><keywords>Rural, transport, connectivity, giving up driving, health, wellbeing, volunteering, social isolation</keywords><publishedDay>29</publishedDay><publishedMonth>4</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2014</publishedYear><publishedDate>2014-04-29</publishedDate><doi>10.1332/policypress/9781447310303.001.0001</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Centre for Innovative Ageing</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HIA</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><lastEdited>2019-07-01T16:32:09.1558358</lastEdited><Created>2014-05-06T14:22:14.4092996</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Centre for Innovative Ageing</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Graham</firstname><surname>Parkhurst</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Kate</firstname><surname>Galvin</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Charles</firstname><surname>Musselwhite</surname><orcid>0000-0002-4831-2092</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Judith</firstname><surname>Phillips</surname><orcid/><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Ian</firstname><surname>Shergold</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Les</firstname><surname>Todres</surname><order>6</order></author></authors><documents/></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-07-01T16:32:09.1558358 v2 17932 2014-05-06 Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society db24d12db193b13c183004bdd2b91660 Judith Phillips Judith Phillips true false c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c 0000-0002-4831-2092 Charles Musselwhite Charles Musselwhite true false 2014-05-06 HIA The chapter argues for an understanding of connectivity through mobility by elders living in rural areas that goes beyond the traditional transport planning focus on the supply and demand of transport services. This involves consideration of not just physical movement but also all the other ways in which older people can be ‘mobile’ for connectivity and the wider benefits and meanings mobility brings, for example video-calling grandchildren using computer software, finding out about shopping delivery services for use in bad weather, or compiling a scrapbook about a past alpine holiday. Following a brief review of methods, a conceptual framework for mobility which can be applied across the lifecourse is presented. The following section applies this framework as context to understanding some of the key mobility policy and practice challenges for the promotion of connectivity of rural elders, which relate to the availability of mobility options - cars in particular - and the associated issues of accessibility and mobility-linked social exclusion. It is concluded that the more holistic appraisal of mobility for older citizens bring important conceptual benefits. A picture of rural areas being more car intensive but less car dependent than identified in previous studies emerges, with accessibility for connectivity also relatively unproblematic. Practical relevance is drawn out for planning and urban design as well as for health and social care professionals. Book chapter Countryside Connections: Older people, Community and Place in Rural Britain. Policy Press Scholarship Online Rural, transport, connectivity, giving up driving, health, wellbeing, volunteering, social isolation 29 4 2014 2014-04-29 10.1332/policypress/9781447310303.001.0001 COLLEGE NANME Centre for Innovative Ageing COLLEGE CODE HIA Swansea University 2019-07-01T16:32:09.1558358 2014-05-06T14:22:14.4092996 College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing Graham Parkhurst 1 Kate Galvin 2 Charles Musselwhite 0000-0002-4831-2092 3 Judith Phillips 4 Ian Shergold 5 Les Todres 6
title Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society
spellingShingle Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society
Judith, Phillips
Charles, Musselwhite
title_short Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society
title_full Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society
title_fullStr Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society
title_full_unstemmed Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society
title_sort Beyond Transport: Understanding the Role of Mobilities in Connecting Rural Elders in Civic Society
author_id_str_mv db24d12db193b13c183004bdd2b91660
c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c
author_id_fullname_str_mv db24d12db193b13c183004bdd2b91660_***_Judith, Phillips
c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c_***_Charles, Musselwhite
author Judith, Phillips
Charles, Musselwhite
format Book chapter
container_title Countryside Connections: Older people, Community and Place in Rural Britain.
publishDate 2014
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1332/policypress/9781447310303.001.0001
publisher Policy Press Scholarship Online
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Centre for Innovative Ageing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Centre for Innovative Ageing
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description The chapter argues for an understanding of connectivity through mobility by elders living in rural areas that goes beyond the traditional transport planning focus on the supply and demand of transport services. This involves consideration of not just physical movement but also all the other ways in which older people can be ‘mobile’ for connectivity and the wider benefits and meanings mobility brings, for example video-calling grandchildren using computer software, finding out about shopping delivery services for use in bad weather, or compiling a scrapbook about a past alpine holiday. Following a brief review of methods, a conceptual framework for mobility which can be applied across the lifecourse is presented. The following section applies this framework as context to understanding some of the key mobility policy and practice challenges for the promotion of connectivity of rural elders, which relate to the availability of mobility options - cars in particular - and the associated issues of accessibility and mobility-linked social exclusion. It is concluded that the more holistic appraisal of mobility for older citizens bring important conceptual benefits. A picture of rural areas being more car intensive but less car dependent than identified in previous studies emerges, with accessibility for connectivity also relatively unproblematic. Practical relevance is drawn out for planning and urban design as well as for health and social care professionals.
published_date 2014-04-29T03:30:12Z
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