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Journal article 1367 views

Assessing the day-residue and dream-lag effects using the identification of multiple correspondences between dream reports and waking life diaries

Josephine A. Henley-Einion, Mark Blagrove Orcid Logo

Dreaming, Volume: 24, Issue: 2, Pages: 71 - 88

Swansea University Author: Mark Blagrove Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1037/a0036329

Abstract

Several studies have found a high incorporation of waking life events intodreams that occur during the following night (day-residue effect), then a decrease inincorporation into dreams over the next 2 to 4 nights, followed by a resurgence ofincorporation into dreams 5 to 7 days after events (dream-l...

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Published in: Dreaming
Published: 2014
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa18610
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first_indexed 2014-10-05T01:58:30Z
last_indexed 2019-06-14T19:28:03Z
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spelling 2019-06-14T16:39:23.2773811 v2 18610 2014-10-04 Assessing the day-residue and dream-lag effects using the identification of multiple correspondences between dream reports and waking life diaries 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c 0000-0002-9854-1854 Mark Blagrove Mark Blagrove true false 2014-10-04 HPS Several studies have found a high incorporation of waking life events intodreams that occur during the following night (day-residue effect), then a decrease inincorporation into dreams over the next 2 to 4 nights, followed by a resurgence ofincorporation into dreams 5 to 7 days after events (dream-lag effect). These studiesinvolve dream diary and daily diary keeping across a 1 to 2 week period, after whichparticipants or judges give a single rating to the degree of correspondence betweeneach dream report and each diary record. In the current study, participants (3 males,11 females; mean age 50.62 years) rated separately the intensity of as manycorrespondences as they could identify between each dream report and each diaryrecord. From these multiple ratings, summary variables, including total number andtotal intensity of correspondences, were computed for periods between the daily diaryand occurrence of the dream of 1 to 10 days. The dream-lag effect was not found. Theday-residue effect was found for a group (n 7) defined as having identified a belowmedian total number of correspondences across the study. It appears that individualswho identify large numbers of correspondences dilute the day-residue effect.Suggestions are made for personality characteristics of such individuals, who displaywhat may be akin to a Barnum effect in their response to the comparison of dreamreports to daily diary records. Journal Article Dreaming 24 2 71 88 dream 1 6 2014 2014-06-01 10.1037/a0036329 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2019-06-14T16:39:23.2773811 2014-10-04T18:00:55.4509887 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Psychology Josephine A. Henley-Einion 1 Mark Blagrove 0000-0002-9854-1854 2
title Assessing the day-residue and dream-lag effects using the identification of multiple correspondences between dream reports and waking life diaries
spellingShingle Assessing the day-residue and dream-lag effects using the identification of multiple correspondences between dream reports and waking life diaries
Mark Blagrove
title_short Assessing the day-residue and dream-lag effects using the identification of multiple correspondences between dream reports and waking life diaries
title_full Assessing the day-residue and dream-lag effects using the identification of multiple correspondences between dream reports and waking life diaries
title_fullStr Assessing the day-residue and dream-lag effects using the identification of multiple correspondences between dream reports and waking life diaries
title_full_unstemmed Assessing the day-residue and dream-lag effects using the identification of multiple correspondences between dream reports and waking life diaries
title_sort Assessing the day-residue and dream-lag effects using the identification of multiple correspondences between dream reports and waking life diaries
author_id_str_mv 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c_***_Mark Blagrove
author Mark Blagrove
author2 Josephine A. Henley-Einion
Mark Blagrove
format Journal article
container_title Dreaming
container_volume 24
container_issue 2
container_start_page 71
publishDate 2014
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1037/a0036329
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Psychology{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Psychology
document_store_str 0
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description Several studies have found a high incorporation of waking life events intodreams that occur during the following night (day-residue effect), then a decrease inincorporation into dreams over the next 2 to 4 nights, followed by a resurgence ofincorporation into dreams 5 to 7 days after events (dream-lag effect). These studiesinvolve dream diary and daily diary keeping across a 1 to 2 week period, after whichparticipants or judges give a single rating to the degree of correspondence betweeneach dream report and each diary record. In the current study, participants (3 males,11 females; mean age 50.62 years) rated separately the intensity of as manycorrespondences as they could identify between each dream report and each diaryrecord. From these multiple ratings, summary variables, including total number andtotal intensity of correspondences, were computed for periods between the daily diaryand occurrence of the dream of 1 to 10 days. The dream-lag effect was not found. Theday-residue effect was found for a group (n 7) defined as having identified a belowmedian total number of correspondences across the study. It appears that individualswho identify large numbers of correspondences dilute the day-residue effect.Suggestions are made for personality characteristics of such individuals, who displaywhat may be akin to a Barnum effect in their response to the comparison of dreamreports to daily diary records.
published_date 2014-06-01T03:22:51Z
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