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A replication of the 5–7day dream-lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as control for baseline matching / Mark Blagrove; Josie Henley-Einion; Amanda Barnett; Darren Edwards; C. Heidi Seage

Consciousness and Cognition, Volume: 20, Issue: 2, Pages: 384 - 391

Swansea University Author: Blagrove, Mark

Abstract

The dream-lag effect refers to there being, after the frequent incorporation of memory elements from the previous day into dreams (the day-residue), a lower incorporation of memory elements from 2 to 4 days before the dream, but then an increased incorporation of memory elements from 5 to 7 days bef...

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Published in: Consciousness and Cognition
ISSN: 1053-8100
Published: 2011
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa9005
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Abstract: The dream-lag effect refers to there being, after the frequent incorporation of memory elements from the previous day into dreams (the day-residue), a lower incorporation of memory elements from 2 to 4 days before the dream, but then an increased incorporation of memory elements from 5 to 7 days before the dream. Participants kept a daily diary and a dream diary for 14 days and then rated the level of matching between every dream report and every daily diary record. A significant dream-lag effect for the 5–7 day period, compared to baseline and compared to the 2–4 day period, was found. This may indicate a memory processing function for sleep, which the dream content may reflect. The paper has significant theoretical implications for the time-course of consolidating autobiographical memory.
Item Description: .
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 2
Start Page: 384
End Page: 391