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A replication of the 5–7day dream-lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as control for baseline matching / Mark Blagrove, Josie Henley-Einion, Amanda Barnett, Darren Edwards, C. Heidi Seage

Consciousness and Cognition, Volume: 20, Issue: 2, Pages: 384 - 391

Swansea University Authors: Mark Blagrove, Darren Edwards

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Abstract

The dream-lag effect refers to there being, after the frequent incorporation of memory elements from the previous day into dreams (the day-residue), a lower incorporation of memory elements from 2 to 4 days before the dream, but then an increased incorporation of memory elements from 5 to 7 days bef...

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Published in: Consciousness and Cognition
ISSN: 1053-8100
Published: 2011
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa9005
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spelling 2019-06-13T15:41:03.7284833 v2 9005 2012-03-05 A replication of the 5–7day dream-lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as control for baseline matching 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c 0000-0002-9854-1854 Mark Blagrove Mark Blagrove true false bee507022c083d875238b7802b96cbeb 0000-0002-2143-1198 Darren Edwards Darren Edwards true false 2012-03-05 HPS The dream-lag effect refers to there being, after the frequent incorporation of memory elements from the previous day into dreams (the day-residue), a lower incorporation of memory elements from 2 to 4 days before the dream, but then an increased incorporation of memory elements from 5 to 7 days before the dream. Participants kept a daily diary and a dream diary for 14 days and then rated the level of matching between every dream report and every daily diary record. A significant dream-lag effect for the 5–7 day period, compared to baseline and compared to the 2–4 day period, was found. This may indicate a memory processing function for sleep, which the dream content may reflect. The paper has significant theoretical implications for the time-course of consolidating autobiographical memory. Journal Article Consciousness and Cognition 20 2 384 391 1053-8100 30 6 2011 2011-06-30 10.1016/j.concog.2010.07.006 . COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2019-06-13T15:41:03.7284833 2012-03-05T11:42:36.2042400 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Mark Blagrove 0000-0002-9854-1854 1 Josie Henley-Einion 2 Amanda Barnett 3 Darren Edwards 0000-0002-2143-1198 4 C. Heidi Seage 5
title A replication of the 5–7day dream-lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as control for baseline matching
spellingShingle A replication of the 5–7day dream-lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as control for baseline matching
Mark, Blagrove
Darren, Edwards
title_short A replication of the 5–7day dream-lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as control for baseline matching
title_full A replication of the 5–7day dream-lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as control for baseline matching
title_fullStr A replication of the 5–7day dream-lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as control for baseline matching
title_full_unstemmed A replication of the 5–7day dream-lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as control for baseline matching
title_sort A replication of the 5–7day dream-lag effect with comparison of dreams to future events as control for baseline matching
author_id_str_mv 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c
bee507022c083d875238b7802b96cbeb
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c_***_Mark, Blagrove
bee507022c083d875238b7802b96cbeb_***_Darren, Edwards
author Mark, Blagrove
Darren, Edwards
author2 Mark Blagrove
Josie Henley-Einion
Amanda Barnett
Darren Edwards
C. Heidi Seage
format Journal article
container_title Consciousness and Cognition
container_volume 20
container_issue 2
container_start_page 384
publishDate 2011
institution Swansea University
issn 1053-8100
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.concog.2010.07.006
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description The dream-lag effect refers to there being, after the frequent incorporation of memory elements from the previous day into dreams (the day-residue), a lower incorporation of memory elements from 2 to 4 days before the dream, but then an increased incorporation of memory elements from 5 to 7 days before the dream. Participants kept a daily diary and a dream diary for 14 days and then rated the level of matching between every dream report and every daily diary record. A significant dream-lag effect for the 5–7 day period, compared to baseline and compared to the 2–4 day period, was found. This may indicate a memory processing function for sleep, which the dream content may reflect. The paper has significant theoretical implications for the time-course of consolidating autobiographical memory.
published_date 2011-06-30T03:20:14Z
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score 10.8434725