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Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity / Tim Newbold, Lawrence N. Hudson, Samantha L. L. Hill, Sara Contu, Igor Lysenko, Rebecca A. Senior, Luca Borger, Dominic J. Bennett, Argyrios Choimes, Ben Collen, Julie Day, Adriana De Palma, Sandra Díaz, Susy Echeverria-Londoño, Melanie J. Edgar, Anat Feldman, Morgan Garon, Michelle L. K. Harrison, Tamera Alhusseini, Daniel J. Ingram, Yuval Itescu, Jens Kattge, Victoria Kemp, Lucinda Kirkpatrick, Michael Kleyer, David Laginha Pinto Correia, Callum D. Martin, Shai Meiri, Maria Novosolov, Yuan Pan, Helen R. P. Phillips, Drew W. Purves, Alexandra Robinson, Jake Simpson, Sean L. Tuck, Evan Weiher, Hannah J. White, Robert M. Ewers, Georgina M. Mace, Jörn P. W. Scharlemann, Andy Purvis

Nature, Volume: 520, Issue: 7545, Pages: 45 - 50

Swansea University Author: Luca Borger

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DOI (Published version): 10.1038/nature14324

Abstract

Human activities, especially conversion and degradation of habitats, are causing global biodiversity declines. How local ecological assemblages are responding is less clear—a concern given their importance for many ecosystem functions and services. We analysed a terrestrial assemblage database of un...

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Published in: Nature
ISSN: 0028-0836 1476-4687
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20627
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spelling 2020-11-12T11:40:27.3532470 v2 20627 2015-04-12 Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2 0000-0001-8763-5997 Luca Borger Luca Borger true false 2015-04-12 SBI Human activities, especially conversion and degradation of habitats, are causing global biodiversity declines. How local ecological assemblages are responding is less clear—a concern given their importance for many ecosystem functions and services. We analysed a terrestrial assemblage database of unprecedented geographic and taxonomic coverage to quantify local biodiversity responses to land use and related changes. Here we show that in the worst-affected habitats, these pressures reduce within-sample species richness by an average of 76.5%, total abundance by 39.5% and rarefaction-based richness by 40.3%. We estimate that, globally, these pressures have already slightly reduced average within-sample richness (by 13.6%), total abundance (10.7%) and rarefaction-based richness (8.1%), with changes showing marked spatial variation. Rapid further losses are predicted under a business-as-usual land-use scenario; within-sample richness is projected to fall by a further 3.4% globally by 2100, with losses concentrated in biodiverse but economically poor countries. Strong mitigation can deliver much more positive biodiversity changes (up to a 1.9% average increase) that are less strongly related to countries' socioeconomic status. Journal Article Nature 520 7545 45 50 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 0028-0836 1476-4687 Conservation biology, Biodiversity, Community ecology, Species Distribution Models, Natural Resources Management, Ecology, Human land use, Global change, Environmental change 2 4 2015 2015-04-02 10.1038/nature14324 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2020-11-12T11:40:27.3532470 2015-04-12T00:18:53.1223630 College of Science Biosciences Tim Newbold 1 Lawrence N. Hudson 2 Samantha L. L. Hill 3 Sara Contu 4 Igor Lysenko 5 Rebecca A. Senior 6 Luca Borger 0000-0001-8763-5997 7 Dominic J. Bennett 8 Argyrios Choimes 9 Ben Collen 10 Julie Day 11 Adriana De Palma 12 Sandra Díaz 13 Susy Echeverria-Londoño 14 Melanie J. Edgar 15 Anat Feldman 16 Morgan Garon 17 Michelle L. K. Harrison 18 Tamera Alhusseini 19 Daniel J. Ingram 20 Yuval Itescu 21 Jens Kattge 22 Victoria Kemp 23 Lucinda Kirkpatrick 24 Michael Kleyer 25 David Laginha Pinto Correia 26 Callum D. Martin 27 Shai Meiri 28 Maria Novosolov 29 Yuan Pan 30 Helen R. P. Phillips 31 Drew W. Purves 32 Alexandra Robinson 33 Jake Simpson 34 Sean L. Tuck 35 Evan Weiher 36 Hannah J. White 37 Robert M. Ewers 38 Georgina M. Mace 39 Jörn P. W. Scharlemann 40 Andy Purvis 41 0020627-08072015235149.pdf NewboldetalSuppInf_final.pdf 2015-07-08T23:51:49.3930000 Output 280210 application/pdf Supplemental material true 2015-10-02T00:00:00.0000000 true 0020627-08072015235109.pdf NewboldetalManuscript_final.pdf 2015-07-08T23:51:09.4270000 Output 345950 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2015-10-02T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity
spellingShingle Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity
Luca, Borger
title_short Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity
title_full Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity
title_fullStr Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity
title_full_unstemmed Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity
title_sort Global effects of land use on local terrestrial biodiversity
author_id_str_mv 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2_***_Luca, Borger
author Luca, Borger
author2 Tim Newbold
Lawrence N. Hudson
Samantha L. L. Hill
Sara Contu
Igor Lysenko
Rebecca A. Senior
Luca Borger
Dominic J. Bennett
Argyrios Choimes
Ben Collen
Julie Day
Adriana De Palma
Sandra Díaz
Susy Echeverria-Londoño
Melanie J. Edgar
Anat Feldman
Morgan Garon
Michelle L. K. Harrison
Tamera Alhusseini
Daniel J. Ingram
Yuval Itescu
Jens Kattge
Victoria Kemp
Lucinda Kirkpatrick
Michael Kleyer
David Laginha Pinto Correia
Callum D. Martin
Shai Meiri
Maria Novosolov
Yuan Pan
Helen R. P. Phillips
Drew W. Purves
Alexandra Robinson
Jake Simpson
Sean L. Tuck
Evan Weiher
Hannah J. White
Robert M. Ewers
Georgina M. Mace
Jörn P. W. Scharlemann
Andy Purvis
format Journal article
container_title Nature
container_volume 520
container_issue 7545
container_start_page 45
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
issn 0028-0836
1476-4687
doi_str_mv 10.1038/nature14324
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
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description Human activities, especially conversion and degradation of habitats, are causing global biodiversity declines. How local ecological assemblages are responding is less clear—a concern given their importance for many ecosystem functions and services. We analysed a terrestrial assemblage database of unprecedented geographic and taxonomic coverage to quantify local biodiversity responses to land use and related changes. Here we show that in the worst-affected habitats, these pressures reduce within-sample species richness by an average of 76.5%, total abundance by 39.5% and rarefaction-based richness by 40.3%. We estimate that, globally, these pressures have already slightly reduced average within-sample richness (by 13.6%), total abundance (10.7%) and rarefaction-based richness (8.1%), with changes showing marked spatial variation. Rapid further losses are predicted under a business-as-usual land-use scenario; within-sample richness is projected to fall by a further 3.4% globally by 2100, with losses concentrated in biodiverse but economically poor countries. Strong mitigation can deliver much more positive biodiversity changes (up to a 1.9% average increase) that are less strongly related to countries' socioeconomic status.
published_date 2015-04-02T03:34:42Z
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