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The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep

E. van Rijn, J.-B. Eichenlaub, P.A. Lewis, M.P. Walker, M.G. Gaskell, J.E. Malinowski, M. Blagrove, Mark Blagrove Orcid Logo

Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, Volume: 122, Pages: 98 - 109

Swansea University Author: Mark Blagrove Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Incorporation of details from waking life events into Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep dreams has been found to be highest on the night after, and then 5–7 nights after events (termed, respectively, the day-residue and dream-lag effects). In experiment 1, 44 participants kept a daily log for 10 days,...

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Published in: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
ISSN: 1074-7427
Published: 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20774
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spelling 2020-12-09T10:05:19.4956233 v2 20774 2015-04-18 The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c 0000-0002-9854-1854 Mark Blagrove Mark Blagrove true false 2015-04-18 HPS Incorporation of details from waking life events into Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep dreams has been found to be highest on the night after, and then 5–7 nights after events (termed, respectively, the day-residue and dream-lag effects). In experiment 1, 44 participants kept a daily log for 10 days, reporting major daily activities (MDAs), personally significant events (PSEs), and major concerns (MCs). Dream reports were collected from REM and Slow Wave Sleep (SWS) in the laboratory, or from REM sleep at home. The dream-lag effect was found for the incorporation of PSEs into REM dreams collected at home, but not for MDAs or MCs. No dream-lag effect was found for SWS dreams, or for REM dreams collected in the lab after SWS awakenings earlier in the night. In experiment 2, the 44 participants recorded reports of their spontaneously recalled home dreams over the 10 nights following the instrumental awakenings night, which thus acted as a controlled stimulus with two salience levels, high (sleep lab) and low (home awakenings). The dream-lag effect was found for the incorporation into home dreams of references to the experience of being in the sleep laboratory, but only for participants who had reported concerns beforehand about being in the sleep laboratory. The delayed incorporation of events from daily life into dreams has been proposed to reflect REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation. However, an alternative emotion processing or emotional impact of events account, distinct from memory consolidation, is supported by the finding that SWS dreams do not evidence the dream-lag effect. Journal Article Neurobiology of Learning and Memory 122 98 109 1074-7427 1 7 2015 2015-07-01 10.1016/j.nlm.2015.01.009 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1074742715000246 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University ESRC 2020-12-09T10:05:19.4956233 2015-04-18T17:12:02.3682758 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Psychology E. van Rijn 1 J.-B. Eichenlaub 2 P.A. Lewis 3 M.P. Walker 4 M.G. Gaskell 5 J.E. Malinowski 6 M. Blagrove 7 Mark Blagrove 0000-0002-9854-1854 8 0020774-29042019125804.pdf vanRijnEtAl2015.pdf 2019-04-29T12:58:04.7200000 Output 668406 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-04-28T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng
title The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep
spellingShingle The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep
Mark Blagrove
title_short The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep
title_full The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep
title_fullStr The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep
title_full_unstemmed The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep
title_sort The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep
author_id_str_mv 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c_***_Mark Blagrove
author Mark Blagrove
author2 E. van Rijn
J.-B. Eichenlaub
P.A. Lewis
M.P. Walker
M.G. Gaskell
J.E. Malinowski
M. Blagrove
Mark Blagrove
format Journal article
container_title Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
container_volume 122
container_start_page 98
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
issn 1074-7427
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.nlm.2015.01.009
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Psychology{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Psychology
url http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1074742715000246
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description Incorporation of details from waking life events into Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep dreams has been found to be highest on the night after, and then 5–7 nights after events (termed, respectively, the day-residue and dream-lag effects). In experiment 1, 44 participants kept a daily log for 10 days, reporting major daily activities (MDAs), personally significant events (PSEs), and major concerns (MCs). Dream reports were collected from REM and Slow Wave Sleep (SWS) in the laboratory, or from REM sleep at home. The dream-lag effect was found for the incorporation of PSEs into REM dreams collected at home, but not for MDAs or MCs. No dream-lag effect was found for SWS dreams, or for REM dreams collected in the lab after SWS awakenings earlier in the night. In experiment 2, the 44 participants recorded reports of their spontaneously recalled home dreams over the 10 nights following the instrumental awakenings night, which thus acted as a controlled stimulus with two salience levels, high (sleep lab) and low (home awakenings). The dream-lag effect was found for the incorporation into home dreams of references to the experience of being in the sleep laboratory, but only for participants who had reported concerns beforehand about being in the sleep laboratory. The delayed incorporation of events from daily life into dreams has been proposed to reflect REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation. However, an alternative emotion processing or emotional impact of events account, distinct from memory consolidation, is supported by the finding that SWS dreams do not evidence the dream-lag effect.
published_date 2015-07-01T03:25:19Z
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