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Longitudinal investigation of training status and cardiopulmonary responses in pre- and early-pubertal children / M. A. McNarry, K. A. Mackintosh, K. Stoedefalke, Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh

European Journal of Applied Physiology, Volume: 114, Issue: 8, Pages: 1573 - 1580

Swansea University Authors: Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh

Abstract

PurposeThe presence of a maturational threshold that modulates children’s physiological responses to exercise training continues to be debated, not least due to a lack of longitudinal evidence to address this question. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction between swim-trainin...

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Published in: European Journal of Applied Physiology
ISSN: 1439-6319 1439-6327
Published: 2014
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21417
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2018-04-26T05:09:22.6181698</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>21417</id><entry>2015-05-14</entry><title>Longitudinal investigation of training status and cardiopulmonary responses in pre- and early-pubertal children</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0813-7477</ORCID><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><name>Melitta McNarry</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0355-6357</ORCID><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><name>Kelly Mackintosh</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2015-05-14</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>PurposeThe presence of a maturational threshold that modulates children&#x2019;s physiological responses to exercise training continues to be debated, not least due to a lack of longitudinal evidence to address this question. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction between swim-training status and maturity in nineteen trained (T, 10 &#xB1; 1 years, &#x2212;2.4 &#xB1; 1.9 years pre-peak height velocity, 8 boys) and fifteen untrained (UT, 10 &#xB1; 1 years, &#x2212;2.3 &#xB1; 0.9 years pre-peak height velocity, 5 boys) children, at three annual measurements.MethodsIn addition to pulmonary gas exchange measurements, stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output ( Q&#x2D9;) were estimated by thoracic bioelectrical impedance during incremental ramp exercise.ResultsAt baseline and both subsequent measurement points, trained children had significantly (P &amp;#60; 0.05) higher peak oxygen uptake (year 1 T 1.75 &#xB1; 0.34 vs. UT 1.49 &#xB1; 0.22; year 2 T 2.01 &#xB1; 0.31 vs. UT 1.65 &#xB1; 0.08; year 3 T 2.07 &#xB1; 0.30 vs. UT 1.77 &#xB1; 0.16 l min&#x2212;1) and Q&#x2D9; (year 1 T 15.0 &#xB1; 2.9 vs. UT 13.2 &#xB1; 2.2; year 2 T 16.1 &#xB1; 2.8 vs. UT 13.8 &#xB1; 2.9; year 3 T 19.3 &#xB1; 4.4 vs. UT 16.0 &#xB1; 2.7 l min&#x2212;1). Furthermore, the SV response pattern differed significantly with training status, demonstrating the conventional plateau in UT but a progressive increase in T. Multilevel modelling revealed that none of the measured pulmonary or cardiovascular parameters interacted with maturational status, and the magnitude of the difference between T and UT was similar, irrespective of maturational status.ConclusionThe results of this novel longitudinal study challenge the notion that differences in training status in young people are only evident once a maturational threshold has been exceeded.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>European Journal of Applied Physiology</journal><volume>114</volume><journalNumber>8</journalNumber><paginationStart>1573</paginationStart><paginationEnd>1580</paginationEnd><publisher/><issnPrint>1439-6319</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1439-6327</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>8</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2014</publishedYear><publishedDate>2014-08-31</publishedDate><doi>10.1007/s00421-014-2890-1</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2018-04-26T05:09:22.6181698</lastEdited><Created>2015-05-14T21:15:02.0523524</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>M. A.</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>K. A.</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>K.</firstname><surname>Stoedefalke</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0813-7477</orcid><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0355-6357</orcid><order>5</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0021417-14032016171741.pdf</filename><originalFilename>Final.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2016-03-14T17:17:41.5630000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>396326</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2016-03-14T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2018-04-26T05:09:22.6181698 v2 21417 2015-05-14 Longitudinal investigation of training status and cardiopulmonary responses in pre- and early-pubertal children 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 2015-05-14 STSC PurposeThe presence of a maturational threshold that modulates children’s physiological responses to exercise training continues to be debated, not least due to a lack of longitudinal evidence to address this question. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction between swim-training status and maturity in nineteen trained (T, 10 ± 1 years, −2.4 ± 1.9 years pre-peak height velocity, 8 boys) and fifteen untrained (UT, 10 ± 1 years, −2.3 ± 0.9 years pre-peak height velocity, 5 boys) children, at three annual measurements.MethodsIn addition to pulmonary gas exchange measurements, stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output ( Q˙) were estimated by thoracic bioelectrical impedance during incremental ramp exercise.ResultsAt baseline and both subsequent measurement points, trained children had significantly (P &#60; 0.05) higher peak oxygen uptake (year 1 T 1.75 ± 0.34 vs. UT 1.49 ± 0.22; year 2 T 2.01 ± 0.31 vs. UT 1.65 ± 0.08; year 3 T 2.07 ± 0.30 vs. UT 1.77 ± 0.16 l min−1) and Q˙ (year 1 T 15.0 ± 2.9 vs. UT 13.2 ± 2.2; year 2 T 16.1 ± 2.8 vs. UT 13.8 ± 2.9; year 3 T 19.3 ± 4.4 vs. UT 16.0 ± 2.7 l min−1). Furthermore, the SV response pattern differed significantly with training status, demonstrating the conventional plateau in UT but a progressive increase in T. Multilevel modelling revealed that none of the measured pulmonary or cardiovascular parameters interacted with maturational status, and the magnitude of the difference between T and UT was similar, irrespective of maturational status.ConclusionThe results of this novel longitudinal study challenge the notion that differences in training status in young people are only evident once a maturational threshold has been exceeded. Journal Article European Journal of Applied Physiology 114 8 1573 1580 1439-6319 1439-6327 31 8 2014 2014-08-31 10.1007/s00421-014-2890-1 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2018-04-26T05:09:22.6181698 2015-05-14T21:15:02.0523524 College of Engineering Engineering M. A. McNarry 1 K. A. Mackintosh 2 K. Stoedefalke 3 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 4 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 5 0021417-14032016171741.pdf Final.pdf 2016-03-14T17:17:41.5630000 Output 396326 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2016-03-14T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Longitudinal investigation of training status and cardiopulmonary responses in pre- and early-pubertal children
spellingShingle Longitudinal investigation of training status and cardiopulmonary responses in pre- and early-pubertal children
Melitta, McNarry
Kelly, Mackintosh
title_short Longitudinal investigation of training status and cardiopulmonary responses in pre- and early-pubertal children
title_full Longitudinal investigation of training status and cardiopulmonary responses in pre- and early-pubertal children
title_fullStr Longitudinal investigation of training status and cardiopulmonary responses in pre- and early-pubertal children
title_full_unstemmed Longitudinal investigation of training status and cardiopulmonary responses in pre- and early-pubertal children
title_sort Longitudinal investigation of training status and cardiopulmonary responses in pre- and early-pubertal children
author_id_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
author_id_fullname_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
author Melitta, McNarry
Kelly, Mackintosh
author2 M. A. McNarry
K. A. Mackintosh
K. Stoedefalke
Melitta McNarry
Kelly Mackintosh
format Journal article
container_title European Journal of Applied Physiology
container_volume 114
container_issue 8
container_start_page 1573
publishDate 2014
institution Swansea University
issn 1439-6319
1439-6327
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s00421-014-2890-1
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description PurposeThe presence of a maturational threshold that modulates children’s physiological responses to exercise training continues to be debated, not least due to a lack of longitudinal evidence to address this question. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction between swim-training status and maturity in nineteen trained (T, 10 ± 1 years, −2.4 ± 1.9 years pre-peak height velocity, 8 boys) and fifteen untrained (UT, 10 ± 1 years, −2.3 ± 0.9 years pre-peak height velocity, 5 boys) children, at three annual measurements.MethodsIn addition to pulmonary gas exchange measurements, stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output ( Q˙) were estimated by thoracic bioelectrical impedance during incremental ramp exercise.ResultsAt baseline and both subsequent measurement points, trained children had significantly (P &#60; 0.05) higher peak oxygen uptake (year 1 T 1.75 ± 0.34 vs. UT 1.49 ± 0.22; year 2 T 2.01 ± 0.31 vs. UT 1.65 ± 0.08; year 3 T 2.07 ± 0.30 vs. UT 1.77 ± 0.16 l min−1) and Q˙ (year 1 T 15.0 ± 2.9 vs. UT 13.2 ± 2.2; year 2 T 16.1 ± 2.8 vs. UT 13.8 ± 2.9; year 3 T 19.3 ± 4.4 vs. UT 16.0 ± 2.7 l min−1). Furthermore, the SV response pattern differed significantly with training status, demonstrating the conventional plateau in UT but a progressive increase in T. Multilevel modelling revealed that none of the measured pulmonary or cardiovascular parameters interacted with maturational status, and the magnitude of the difference between T and UT was similar, irrespective of maturational status.ConclusionThe results of this novel longitudinal study challenge the notion that differences in training status in young people are only evident once a maturational threshold has been exceeded.
published_date 2014-08-31T03:34:36Z
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