No Cover Image

Journal article 339 views 38 downloads

Effects of Sex, Training, and Maturity Status on the Cardiopulmonary and Muscle Deoxygenation Responses during Incremental Ramp Exercise

Adam Runacres, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, Tim Evans, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume: 19, Issue: 12, Start page: 7410

Swansea University Authors: Adam Runacres, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

  • 60248.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    Copyright: © 2022 by the authors. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license

    Download (333.1KB)

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.3390/ijerph19127410

Abstract

Whilst participation in regular exercise and sport has generally increased over recent decades globally, fundamental questions remain regarding the influence of growth, maturation, and sex on the magnitude of training response throughout adolescence. Trained (108 participants, 43 girls; age: 14.3 ±...

Full description

Published in: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ISSN: 1660-4601
Published: MDPI AG 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60248
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Whilst participation in regular exercise and sport has generally increased over recent decades globally, fundamental questions remain regarding the influence of growth, maturation, and sex on the magnitude of training response throughout adolescence. Trained (108 participants, 43 girls; age: 14.3 ± 1.8 years) and untrained (108 participants, 43 girls; age: 14.7 ± 1.7 years) adolescents completed an incremental ramp test to exhaustion during which breath by gas exchange, beat-by-beat heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (Q̇) and muscle deoxygenation were assessed. Device-based physical activity was also assessed over seven consecutive days. Boys, irrespective of training status, had a significantly higher absolute (2.65 ± 0.70 l min−1 vs. 2.01 ± 0.45 l min−1, p < 0.01) and allometrically scaled (183.8 ± 31.4 mL·kg−b min−1 vs. 146.5 ± 28.5 mL·kg−b min−1, p < 0.01) peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2) than girls. There were no sex differences in peak HR, SV or Q̇ but boys had a higher muscle deoxygenation plateau when expressed against absolute work rate and V̇O2 (p < 0.05). Muscle deoxygenation appears to be more important in determining the sex dif-ferences in peak V̇O2 in youth. Future research should examine the effects of sex on the response to different training methodologies in youth.
Keywords: Aerobic fitness; children; exercise; performance; physiology
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: This work was supported by the Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarships (KESS).It is part funded by the Welsh Government’s European Social Fund (ESF) convergence programme for West Wales and the Valleys.
Issue: 12
Start Page: 7410