No Cover Image

Journal article 1106 views

Mass enhances speed but diminishes turn capacity in terrestrial pursuit predators

Rory Wilson Orcid Logo, Iwan Griffiths, Michael GL Mills, Chris Carbone, John W Wilson, David M Scantlebury

eLife, Volume: 4

Swansea University Authors: Rory Wilson Orcid Logo, Iwan Griffiths

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.7554/eLife.06487

Abstract

The dynamics of predator-prey pursuit appears complex, making the development of a framework explaining predator and prey strategies problematic. We develop a model for terrestrial, cursorial predators to examine how animal mass modulates predator and prey trajectories and affects best strategies fo...

Full description

Published in: eLife
ISSN: 2050-084X
Published: 2015
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa22964
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: The dynamics of predator-prey pursuit appears complex, making the development of a framework explaining predator and prey strategies problematic. We develop a model for terrestrial, cursorial predators to examine how animal mass modulates predator and prey trajectories and affects best strategies for both parties. We incorporated the maximum speed-mass relationship with an explanation of why larger animals should have greater turn radii; the forces needed to turn scale linearly with mass whereas the maximum forces an animal can exert scale to a 2/3 power law. This clarifies why in a meta-analysis, we found a preponderance of predator/prey mass ratios that minimized the turn radii of predators compared to their prey. It also explained why acceleration data from wild cheetahs pursuing different prey showed different cornering behaviour with prey type. The outcome of predator prey pursuits thus depends critically on mass effects and the ability of animals to time turns precisely.
Item Description: Copyright Wilson et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.
Keywords: Mass, pursuit, predator, prey, motion
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering