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Technology and trust: older people's perspectives of a home monitoring system / MABEL L. S. LIE; Stephen Lindsay; KATIE BRITTAIN

Ageing and Society, Volume: 36, Issue: 07, Pages: 1501 - 1525

Swansea University Author: Stephen, Lindsay

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Abstract

With demographic changes and the growing numbers of older people living alone,concerns have been raised about the care of the ageing population. Increasingly,developments in technology are being seen as the solution to these concerns. Forthose who do not see themselves as old or frail enough to requ...

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Published in: Ageing and Society
ISSN: 0144-686X 1469-1779
Published: 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa23864
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spelling 2020-11-30T11:29:51.6109118 v2 23864 2015-10-19 Technology and trust: older people's perspectives of a home monitoring system 0e6c28093df4874b4263b328d7817e09 0000-0001-6063-3676 Stephen Lindsay Stephen Lindsay true false 2015-10-19 SCS With demographic changes and the growing numbers of older people living alone,concerns have been raised about the care of the ageing population. Increasingly,developments in technology are being seen as the solution to these concerns. Forthose who do not see themselves as old or frail enough to require personal care provision,and who prefer to maintain their identity as autonomous and independentindividuals, the development of assistive technologies such as ambient home monitoringsystems is one answer. However, this involves careful negotiations with olderpeople’s understandings of safety and privacy, and their experiences and relationshipswith technology, their carers and relevant service-providers. In two trials of ahome monitoring system funded by the United Kingdom Technology StrategyBoard, older people were interviewed pre-trial and post-trial about their perspectiveson these issues. This paper presents a conceptual analysis of the qualitative datausing a sociological framework of trust that considers habitual action, and relationshipswith kin and with wider institutions. The research found that older people’s habits andnorms do not need to be disrupted by the ambient system. What was of more importancewas relationships between the older person and her or his ‘monitor’ based ontrust, as well as institutional providers who need to instil or earn trust Journal Article Ageing and Society 36 07 1501 1525 0144-686X 1469-1779 older people, ambient assisted living, home monitoring systems, telecare, trust 9 6 2015 2015-06-09 10.1017/S0144686X15000501 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&amp;fid=9761069&amp;jid=ASO&amp;volumeId=-1&amp;issueId=-1&amp;aid=9761064&amp;bodyId=&amp;membershipNumber=&amp;societyETOCSession= COLLEGE NANME Computer Science COLLEGE CODE SCS Swansea University 2020-11-30T11:29:51.6109118 2015-10-19T20:14:24.5538529 College of Science Computer Science MABEL L. S. LIE 1 Stephen Lindsay 0000-0001-6063-3676 2 KATIE BRITTAIN 3
title Technology and trust: older people's perspectives of a home monitoring system
spellingShingle Technology and trust: older people's perspectives of a home monitoring system
Stephen, Lindsay
title_short Technology and trust: older people's perspectives of a home monitoring system
title_full Technology and trust: older people's perspectives of a home monitoring system
title_fullStr Technology and trust: older people's perspectives of a home monitoring system
title_full_unstemmed Technology and trust: older people's perspectives of a home monitoring system
title_sort Technology and trust: older people's perspectives of a home monitoring system
author_id_str_mv 0e6c28093df4874b4263b328d7817e09
author_id_fullname_str_mv 0e6c28093df4874b4263b328d7817e09_***_Stephen, Lindsay
author Stephen, Lindsay
author2 MABEL L. S. LIE
Stephen Lindsay
KATIE BRITTAIN
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publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
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college_str College of Science
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url http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&amp;fid=9761069&amp;jid=ASO&amp;volumeId=-1&amp;issueId=-1&amp;aid=9761064&amp;bodyId=&amp;membershipNumber=&amp;societyETOCSession=
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description With demographic changes and the growing numbers of older people living alone,concerns have been raised about the care of the ageing population. Increasingly,developments in technology are being seen as the solution to these concerns. Forthose who do not see themselves as old or frail enough to require personal care provision,and who prefer to maintain their identity as autonomous and independentindividuals, the development of assistive technologies such as ambient home monitoringsystems is one answer. However, this involves careful negotiations with olderpeople’s understandings of safety and privacy, and their experiences and relationshipswith technology, their carers and relevant service-providers. In two trials of ahome monitoring system funded by the United Kingdom Technology StrategyBoard, older people were interviewed pre-trial and post-trial about their perspectiveson these issues. This paper presents a conceptual analysis of the qualitative datausing a sociological framework of trust that considers habitual action, and relationshipswith kin and with wider institutions. The research found that older people’s habits andnorms do not need to be disrupted by the ambient system. What was of more importancewas relationships between the older person and her or his ‘monitor’ based ontrust, as well as institutional providers who need to instil or earn trust
published_date 2015-06-09T03:34:16Z
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