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Food-specific response inhibition, dietary restraint and snack intake in lean and overweight/obese adults: a moderated-mediation model / S Higgs, Michelle Lee, Menna Price

International Journal of Obesity, Volume: 40, Issue: 5, Pages: 877 - 882

Swansea University Authors: Michelle Lee, Menna Price

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DOI (Published version): 10.1038/ijo.2015.235

Abstract

Background/Objectives: The relationship between response inhibition and obesity is currently unclear. This may be because of inconsistencies in methodology, design limitations and the use of narrow samples. In addition, dietary restraint has not been considered, yet restraint has been reported to mo...

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Published in: International Journal of Obesity
ISSN: 0307-0565 1476-5497
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa24165
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2020-09-09T08:27:35.5253647</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>24165</id><entry>2015-11-05</entry><title>Food-specific response inhibition, dietary restraint and snack intake in lean and overweight/obese adults: a moderated-mediation model</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>503d8657d47c066ada31f344b030c352</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-1291-5895</ORCID><firstname>Michelle</firstname><surname>Lee</surname><name>Michelle Lee</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>e8d0f85a0d2762328c906c75b1d154b7</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-0025-0881</ORCID><firstname>Menna</firstname><surname>Price</surname><name>Menna Price</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2015-11-05</date><deptcode>FGMHL</deptcode><abstract>Background/Objectives: The relationship between response inhibition and obesity is currently unclear. This may be because of inconsistencies in methodology, design limitations and the use of narrow samples. In addition, dietary restraint has not been considered, yet restraint has been reported to moderate performance on behavioural tasks of response inhibition. The aim of this study was to investigate performance on both a food-based and a neutral stimuli go/no-go task, which addresses current design limitations, in lean and overweight/obese adults. The moderating role of dietary restraint in the relationship between body composition, response inhibition and snack intake was also measured. Subjects/methods: Lean and overweight/obese, males and females (N=116) completed both a food-based and neutral category control go/no-go task, in a fully counterbalanced repeated-measures design. A bogus taste-test was then completed, followed by a self-report measure of dietary restraint. Results: PROCESS moderated-mediation analysis showed that overweight/obese, compared to lean, participants made more errors on the food-based (but not the neutral) go/no-go task, but only when they were low in dietary restraint. Performance on the food-based go/no-go task predicted snack intake across the sample. Increased intake in the overweight, low restrainers was fully mediated by increased errors on the food-based (but not the neutral) go/no-go task.Conclusions: Distinguishing between high and low restrained eaters in the overweight/obese population is crucial in future obesity research incorporating food-based go/no-go tasks. Poor response inhibition to food cues predicts overeating across weight groups, suggesting weight loss interventions and obesity prevention programmes should target behavioural inhibition training in such individuals.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>International Journal of Obesity</journal><volume>40</volume><journalNumber>5</journalNumber><paginationStart>877</paginationStart><paginationEnd>882</paginationEnd><publisher/><issnPrint>0307-0565</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1476-5497</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>1</publishedDay><publishedMonth>5</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2016</publishedYear><publishedDate>2016-05-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1038/ijo.2015.235</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Medicine, Health and Life Science - Faculty</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>FGMHL</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2020-09-09T08:27:35.5253647</lastEdited><Created>2015-11-05T14:59:06.8353677</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Psychology</level></path><authors><author><firstname>S</firstname><surname>Higgs</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Michelle</firstname><surname>Lee</surname><orcid>0000-0002-1291-5895</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Menna</firstname><surname>Price</surname><orcid>0000-0002-0025-0881</orcid><order>3</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0024165-15082019170458.pdf</filename><originalFilename>24165v2.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2019-08-15T17:04:58.3900000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>500293</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2019-08-14T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><documentNotes>Released under the terms of a Creative Commons AttributionNonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC-BY-NC-SA).</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2020-09-09T08:27:35.5253647 v2 24165 2015-11-05 Food-specific response inhibition, dietary restraint and snack intake in lean and overweight/obese adults: a moderated-mediation model 503d8657d47c066ada31f344b030c352 0000-0002-1291-5895 Michelle Lee Michelle Lee true false e8d0f85a0d2762328c906c75b1d154b7 0000-0002-0025-0881 Menna Price Menna Price true false 2015-11-05 FGMHL Background/Objectives: The relationship between response inhibition and obesity is currently unclear. This may be because of inconsistencies in methodology, design limitations and the use of narrow samples. In addition, dietary restraint has not been considered, yet restraint has been reported to moderate performance on behavioural tasks of response inhibition. The aim of this study was to investigate performance on both a food-based and a neutral stimuli go/no-go task, which addresses current design limitations, in lean and overweight/obese adults. The moderating role of dietary restraint in the relationship between body composition, response inhibition and snack intake was also measured. Subjects/methods: Lean and overweight/obese, males and females (N=116) completed both a food-based and neutral category control go/no-go task, in a fully counterbalanced repeated-measures design. A bogus taste-test was then completed, followed by a self-report measure of dietary restraint. Results: PROCESS moderated-mediation analysis showed that overweight/obese, compared to lean, participants made more errors on the food-based (but not the neutral) go/no-go task, but only when they were low in dietary restraint. Performance on the food-based go/no-go task predicted snack intake across the sample. Increased intake in the overweight, low restrainers was fully mediated by increased errors on the food-based (but not the neutral) go/no-go task.Conclusions: Distinguishing between high and low restrained eaters in the overweight/obese population is crucial in future obesity research incorporating food-based go/no-go tasks. Poor response inhibition to food cues predicts overeating across weight groups, suggesting weight loss interventions and obesity prevention programmes should target behavioural inhibition training in such individuals. Journal Article International Journal of Obesity 40 5 877 882 0307-0565 1476-5497 1 5 2016 2016-05-01 10.1038/ijo.2015.235 COLLEGE NANME Medicine, Health and Life Science - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGMHL Swansea University 2020-09-09T08:27:35.5253647 2015-11-05T14:59:06.8353677 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology S Higgs 1 Michelle Lee 0000-0002-1291-5895 2 Menna Price 0000-0002-0025-0881 3 0024165-15082019170458.pdf 24165v2.pdf 2019-08-15T17:04:58.3900000 Output 500293 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-08-14T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons AttributionNonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC-BY-NC-SA). true eng
title Food-specific response inhibition, dietary restraint and snack intake in lean and overweight/obese adults: a moderated-mediation model
spellingShingle Food-specific response inhibition, dietary restraint and snack intake in lean and overweight/obese adults: a moderated-mediation model
Michelle, Lee
Menna, Price
title_short Food-specific response inhibition, dietary restraint and snack intake in lean and overweight/obese adults: a moderated-mediation model
title_full Food-specific response inhibition, dietary restraint and snack intake in lean and overweight/obese adults: a moderated-mediation model
title_fullStr Food-specific response inhibition, dietary restraint and snack intake in lean and overweight/obese adults: a moderated-mediation model
title_full_unstemmed Food-specific response inhibition, dietary restraint and snack intake in lean and overweight/obese adults: a moderated-mediation model
title_sort Food-specific response inhibition, dietary restraint and snack intake in lean and overweight/obese adults: a moderated-mediation model
author_id_str_mv 503d8657d47c066ada31f344b030c352
e8d0f85a0d2762328c906c75b1d154b7
author_id_fullname_str_mv 503d8657d47c066ada31f344b030c352_***_Michelle, Lee
e8d0f85a0d2762328c906c75b1d154b7_***_Menna, Price
author Michelle, Lee
Menna, Price
author2 S Higgs
Michelle Lee
Menna Price
format Journal article
container_title International Journal of Obesity
container_volume 40
container_issue 5
container_start_page 877
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
issn 0307-0565
1476-5497
doi_str_mv 10.1038/ijo.2015.235
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
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description Background/Objectives: The relationship between response inhibition and obesity is currently unclear. This may be because of inconsistencies in methodology, design limitations and the use of narrow samples. In addition, dietary restraint has not been considered, yet restraint has been reported to moderate performance on behavioural tasks of response inhibition. The aim of this study was to investigate performance on both a food-based and a neutral stimuli go/no-go task, which addresses current design limitations, in lean and overweight/obese adults. The moderating role of dietary restraint in the relationship between body composition, response inhibition and snack intake was also measured. Subjects/methods: Lean and overweight/obese, males and females (N=116) completed both a food-based and neutral category control go/no-go task, in a fully counterbalanced repeated-measures design. A bogus taste-test was then completed, followed by a self-report measure of dietary restraint. Results: PROCESS moderated-mediation analysis showed that overweight/obese, compared to lean, participants made more errors on the food-based (but not the neutral) go/no-go task, but only when they were low in dietary restraint. Performance on the food-based go/no-go task predicted snack intake across the sample. Increased intake in the overweight, low restrainers was fully mediated by increased errors on the food-based (but not the neutral) go/no-go task.Conclusions: Distinguishing between high and low restrained eaters in the overweight/obese population is crucial in future obesity research incorporating food-based go/no-go tasks. Poor response inhibition to food cues predicts overeating across weight groups, suggesting weight loss interventions and obesity prevention programmes should target behavioural inhibition training in such individuals.
published_date 2016-05-01T03:37:43Z
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