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Lucid dreaming frequency and alarm clock snooze button use / Bethan Victoria Smith; Mark Blagrove

Dreaming, Volume: 25, Issue: 4, Pages: 291 - 299

Swansea University Author: Blagrove, Mark

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DOI (Published version): 10.1037/drm0000012

Abstract

There have been suggestions that the deliberate alteration of sleep-related behaviors, such as briefly going back to sleep after waking, can be used to induce lucid dreams. The current study extends this work by investigating the association between lucid dream frequency and alarm clock use. Eighty-...

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Published in: Dreaming
Published: 2015
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa25493
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Abstract: There have been suggestions that the deliberate alteration of sleep-related behaviors, such as briefly going back to sleep after waking, can be used to induce lucid dreams. The current study extends this work by investigating the association between lucid dream frequency and alarm clock use. Eighty-four participants (44 females, 39 males, 1 not stated, mean age = 33.80 years, SD = 15.00) completed an online retrospective questionnaire that measured lucid dreaming frequency, frequency of alarm clock use, frequency of snooze button use per morning, and average number of awakenings per night. Significant positive relationships were found between lucid dreaming frequency and number of awakenings per night (ρ = .30), number of uses of alarm clock snoozing function per morning (ρ = .22), and dream recall frequency (ρ = .52). In a logistic regression, whether a participant had ever had a lucid dream was predicted only by overall dream recall frequency and frequency of snooze button use (Exp(B) odds ratios = 4.92 and 2.52, respectively). Reasons for the association might be that lucid dreamers and snooze button users share some individual difference characteristic or that the brief awakenings followed by snoozing might elicit brain activation or sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods, hence resulting in a greater likelihood of lucid dreams.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 4
Start Page: 291
End Page: 299