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Investigating the Relative Exercise Intensity of Exergames in Prepubertal Children / Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh

Games for Health Journal, Volume: 5, Issue: 2, Pages: 135 - 140

Swansea University Authors: Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh

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DOI (Published version): 10.1089/g4h.2015.0094

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Objective:Literature remains equivocal as to whether exergames elicit energy expenditure (EE) commensurate with physical activity guidelines. Such discrepancies may be attributable to a reliance on absolute exercise intensities which fail to account for differences in cardiorespiratory fitness level...

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Published in: Games for Health Journal
ISSN: 2161-7856
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa26152
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spelling 2020-05-27T11:30:52.6411790 v2 26152 2016-02-11 Investigating the Relative Exercise Intensity of Exergames in Prepubertal Children 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 2016-02-11 STSC Objective:Literature remains equivocal as to whether exergames elicit energy expenditure (EE) commensurate with physical activity guidelines. Such discrepancies may be attributable to a reliance on absolute exercise intensities which fail to account for differences in cardiorespiratory fitness levels. Materials and Methods:Thirty four pre-pubertal children (20 boys, 10.8±1.0 yrs) completed a 30 minute exergame (two 15 minute games; Kinect Adventures!; Xbox 360) and an incremental treadmill test to determine peak O2 throughout which breath-by-breath gas exchange was measured. Results:Both games elicited moderate intensity (5.7±1.5 and 5.5±1.4 METs), with 36% demonstrating a mean EE in excess of 6.0 METs, commensurate with vigorous intensity. Furthermore, boys demonstrated higher EE during both games (Game 1: boys, 6.0±1.7 vs. girls, 5.2±1.0; Game 2: boys, 6.0±1.4 vs. girls, 4.9±1.2 METs; P<0.05). Hierarchical linear regression revealed sex, maturity and fitness to be significant predictors of EE, accounting for 24%: relative exergame O2=24.53+(2.12*Sex)–(0.42*Maturity offset)–(0.16*relative peak O2). There was no correlation between absolute O2 during the exergames and peak O2 but O2 expressed as a percentage of peak O2 was correlated with peak O2 during both game 1 (r=-0.62, P<0.01) and game 2 (r =-0.59, P<0.01).Conclusion:The present findings provide further evidence that exergames can elicit energy expenditures commensurate with national physical activity guidelines and extend our understanding of the mediators of EE. Specifically, cardiorespiratory fitness and sex must both be considered in the design and implementation of future interventions seeking to utilise exergames to enhance physical activity levels and/or cardiorespiratory fitness. Journal Article Games for Health Journal 5 2 135 140 2161-7856 30 3 2016 2016-03-30 10.1089/g4h.2015.0094 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-05-27T11:30:52.6411790 2016-02-11T10:39:55.9583407 College of Engineering Sports Science Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 1 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 2 0026152-11022016104043.pdf Exercise_Intensity_Accepted_Paper.pdf 2016-02-11T10:40:43.8500000 Output 350714 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2016-02-11T00:00:00.0000000 false
title Investigating the Relative Exercise Intensity of Exergames in Prepubertal Children
spellingShingle Investigating the Relative Exercise Intensity of Exergames in Prepubertal Children
Melitta, McNarry
Kelly, Mackintosh
title_short Investigating the Relative Exercise Intensity of Exergames in Prepubertal Children
title_full Investigating the Relative Exercise Intensity of Exergames in Prepubertal Children
title_fullStr Investigating the Relative Exercise Intensity of Exergames in Prepubertal Children
title_full_unstemmed Investigating the Relative Exercise Intensity of Exergames in Prepubertal Children
title_sort Investigating the Relative Exercise Intensity of Exergames in Prepubertal Children
author_id_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
author_id_fullname_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
author Melitta, McNarry
Kelly, Mackintosh
author2 Melitta McNarry
Kelly Mackintosh
format Journal article
container_title Games for Health Journal
container_volume 5
container_issue 2
container_start_page 135
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
issn 2161-7856
doi_str_mv 10.1089/g4h.2015.0094
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 1
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description Objective:Literature remains equivocal as to whether exergames elicit energy expenditure (EE) commensurate with physical activity guidelines. Such discrepancies may be attributable to a reliance on absolute exercise intensities which fail to account for differences in cardiorespiratory fitness levels. Materials and Methods:Thirty four pre-pubertal children (20 boys, 10.8±1.0 yrs) completed a 30 minute exergame (two 15 minute games; Kinect Adventures!; Xbox 360) and an incremental treadmill test to determine peak O2 throughout which breath-by-breath gas exchange was measured. Results:Both games elicited moderate intensity (5.7±1.5 and 5.5±1.4 METs), with 36% demonstrating a mean EE in excess of 6.0 METs, commensurate with vigorous intensity. Furthermore, boys demonstrated higher EE during both games (Game 1: boys, 6.0±1.7 vs. girls, 5.2±1.0; Game 2: boys, 6.0±1.4 vs. girls, 4.9±1.2 METs; P<0.05). Hierarchical linear regression revealed sex, maturity and fitness to be significant predictors of EE, accounting for 24%: relative exergame O2=24.53+(2.12*Sex)–(0.42*Maturity offset)–(0.16*relative peak O2). There was no correlation between absolute O2 during the exergames and peak O2 but O2 expressed as a percentage of peak O2 was correlated with peak O2 during both game 1 (r=-0.62, P<0.01) and game 2 (r =-0.59, P<0.01).Conclusion:The present findings provide further evidence that exergames can elicit energy expenditures commensurate with national physical activity guidelines and extend our understanding of the mediators of EE. Specifically, cardiorespiratory fitness and sex must both be considered in the design and implementation of future interventions seeking to utilise exergames to enhance physical activity levels and/or cardiorespiratory fitness.
published_date 2016-03-30T03:40:15Z
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