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Motivational State and Personality in Relation to Emotion, Stress, and HRV Responses to Aerobic Exercise

Yusuke Kuroda, Joanne Hudson Orcid Logo, Rhys Thatcher

Journal of Psychophysiology, Volume: 29, Issue: 4, Pages: 147 - 160

Swansea University Author: Joanne Hudson Orcid Logo

Abstract

This study examined emotion, stress, and performance during aerobic exercise performed in the telic and paratelic states, in relation to telic and paratelic dominance. The study tested the misfit effect and is the first to examine heart rate variability (HRV) responses to exercise in relation to bot...

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Published in: Journal of Psychophysiology
ISSN: 0269-8803 2151-2124
Published: 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa26217
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spelling 2019-03-22T09:34:06.6973368 v2 26217 2016-02-15 Motivational State and Personality in Relation to Emotion, Stress, and HRV Responses to Aerobic Exercise 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99 0000-0003-4732-8356 Joanne Hudson Joanne Hudson true false 2016-02-15 STSC This study examined emotion, stress, and performance during aerobic exercise performed in the telic and paratelic states, in relation to telic and paratelic dominance. The study tested the misfit effect and is the first to examine heart rate variability (HRV) responses to exercise in relation to both personality and motivational state. Based on their Paratelic Dominance Scale scores, participants identified as telic dominant (TD) and paratelic dominant (PD) completed ramp tests following telic and paratelic state manipulations (repeated measures). In each condition, participants watched ‘serious’ (telic) or ‘playful’ (paratelic) videos for 10 min, then performed a ramp test on a cycle ergometer whilst continuing to watch the videos throughout the entire protocol. Motivational state (telic/paratelic), HRV, emotion, and stress levels were measured at baseline, pre, post, and 15 min post-ramp test. Time to exhaustion was measured as an index of performance. Limited support was obtained for the misfit effect as interactions between state and dominance were not revealed for any of the variables with the exception of low frequent (LF) and the low frequent/high frequent ratio (LF/HF % normalized), which can be interpreted as indicating that both groups were more relaxed in their preferred state condition. Regardless, findings offer useful insight into methodological considerations for similar studies, such as consideration of the moderating effects of exercise characteristics. Our findings also confirm a number of reversal theory (Apter, 1982) proposals including the concept of dominance as an individual difference factor, with varying characteristics of different dominances, based on physiological response variables. We recommend continued research into the misfit effect with larger samples, and designs that accommodate the methodological considerations raised by the present results. Journal Article Journal of Psychophysiology 29 4 147 160 0269-8803 2151-2124 Reversal theory; HRV; Emotion; Stress; State manipulation 31 12 2015 2015-12-31 10.1027/0269-8803/a000146 file://en1/eghudsonj$/Downloads/Kuroda%20et%20al%20(2015).pdf COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2019-03-22T09:34:06.6973368 2016-02-15T16:03:13.1155608 College of Engineering Engineering Yusuke Kuroda 1 Joanne Hudson 0000-0003-4732-8356 2 Rhys Thatcher 3 0026217-15022016160353.docx AcceptedFinalKurodaetal.docx 2016-02-15T16:03:53.1470000 Output 1294115 application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document Accepted Manuscript true 2016-02-15T00:00:00.0000000 false
title Motivational State and Personality in Relation to Emotion, Stress, and HRV Responses to Aerobic Exercise
spellingShingle Motivational State and Personality in Relation to Emotion, Stress, and HRV Responses to Aerobic Exercise
Joanne Hudson
title_short Motivational State and Personality in Relation to Emotion, Stress, and HRV Responses to Aerobic Exercise
title_full Motivational State and Personality in Relation to Emotion, Stress, and HRV Responses to Aerobic Exercise
title_fullStr Motivational State and Personality in Relation to Emotion, Stress, and HRV Responses to Aerobic Exercise
title_full_unstemmed Motivational State and Personality in Relation to Emotion, Stress, and HRV Responses to Aerobic Exercise
title_sort Motivational State and Personality in Relation to Emotion, Stress, and HRV Responses to Aerobic Exercise
author_id_str_mv 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99
author_id_fullname_str_mv 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99_***_Joanne Hudson
author Joanne Hudson
author2 Yusuke Kuroda
Joanne Hudson
Rhys Thatcher
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Psychophysiology
container_volume 29
container_issue 4
container_start_page 147
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
issn 0269-8803
2151-2124
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college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
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url file://en1/eghudsonj$/Downloads/Kuroda%20et%20al%20(2015).pdf
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description This study examined emotion, stress, and performance during aerobic exercise performed in the telic and paratelic states, in relation to telic and paratelic dominance. The study tested the misfit effect and is the first to examine heart rate variability (HRV) responses to exercise in relation to both personality and motivational state. Based on their Paratelic Dominance Scale scores, participants identified as telic dominant (TD) and paratelic dominant (PD) completed ramp tests following telic and paratelic state manipulations (repeated measures). In each condition, participants watched ‘serious’ (telic) or ‘playful’ (paratelic) videos for 10 min, then performed a ramp test on a cycle ergometer whilst continuing to watch the videos throughout the entire protocol. Motivational state (telic/paratelic), HRV, emotion, and stress levels were measured at baseline, pre, post, and 15 min post-ramp test. Time to exhaustion was measured as an index of performance. Limited support was obtained for the misfit effect as interactions between state and dominance were not revealed for any of the variables with the exception of low frequent (LF) and the low frequent/high frequent ratio (LF/HF % normalized), which can be interpreted as indicating that both groups were more relaxed in their preferred state condition. Regardless, findings offer useful insight into methodological considerations for similar studies, such as consideration of the moderating effects of exercise characteristics. Our findings also confirm a number of reversal theory (Apter, 1982) proposals including the concept of dominance as an individual difference factor, with varying characteristics of different dominances, based on physiological response variables. We recommend continued research into the misfit effect with larger samples, and designs that accommodate the methodological considerations raised by the present results.
published_date 2015-12-31T03:37:04Z
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