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Complement is activated in progressive multiple sclerosis cortical grey matter lesions / Lewis M. Watkins; James W. Neal; Sam Loveless; Iliana Michailidou; Valeria Ramaglia; Mark I. Rees; Richard Reynolds; Neil P. Robertson; B. Paul Morgan; Owain W. Howell

Journal of Neuroinflammation, Volume: 13, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Howell, Owain

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Abstract

The symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) are caused by damage to myelin and nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. Inflammation is tightly linked with neurodegeneration, and it is the accumulation of neurodegeneration that underlies increasing neurological disability in progressive MS. Determining...

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Published in: Journal of Neuroinflammation
ISSN: 1742-2094
Published: 2016
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa29210
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Abstract: The symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) are caused by damage to myelin and nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. Inflammation is tightly linked with neurodegeneration, and it is the accumulation of neurodegeneration that underlies increasing neurological disability in progressive MS. Determining pathological mechanisms at play in MS grey matter is therefore a key to our understanding of disease progression.
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 1