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Hierarchical structures of cactus spines that aid in the directional movement of dew droplets

Tegwen Malik Orcid Logo, F. T. Malik, R. M. Clement, D. T. Gethin, M. Kiernan, T. Goral, P. Griffiths, D. Beynon, A. R. Parker, David Gethin Orcid Logo, Marc Clement, David Beynon Orcid Logo

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, Volume: 374, Issue: 2073, Start page: 20160110

Swansea University Authors: Tegwen Malik Orcid Logo, David Gethin Orcid Logo, Marc Clement, David Beynon Orcid Logo

DOI (Published version): 10.1098/rsta.2016.0110

Abstract

Three species of cactus whose spines act as dew harvesters were chosen for this study: Copiapoa cinerea var. haseltoniana, Mammillaria columbiana subsp. yucatanensis and Parodia mammulosa and compared with Ferocactus wislizenii whose spines do not perform as dew harvesters. Time-lapse snapshots of C...

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Published in: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Published: 2016
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa29601
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Time-lapse snapshots of C. cinerea showed movement of dew droplets from spine tips to their base, even against gravity. Spines emanating from one of the areoles of C. cinerea were submerged in water laced with fluorescent nanoparticles and this particular areole with its spines and a small area of stem was removed and imaged. These images clearly showed that fluorescent water had moved into the stem of the plant. Lines of vascular bundles radiating inwards from the surface areoles (from where the spines emanate) to the core of the stem were detected using magnetic resonance imaging, with the exception of F. wislizenii that does not harvest dew on its spines. Spine microstructures were examined using SEM images and surface roughness measurements (Ra and Rz) taken of the spines of C. cinerea. It was found that a roughness gradient created by tapered microgrooves existed that could potentially direct surface water from a spine tip to its base.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences</journal><volume>374</volume><journalNumber>2073</journalNumber><paginationStart>20160110</paginationStart><publisher/><keywords/><publishedDay>27</publishedDay><publishedMonth>6</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2016</publishedYear><publishedDate>2016-06-27</publishedDate><doi>10.1098/rsta.2016.0110</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Business</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>BBU</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2019-06-12T15:36:14.8917885</lastEdited><Created>2016-08-19T13:32:02.4909187</Created><path><level id="1">Faculty of Science and Engineering</level><level id="2">School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Tegwen</firstname><surname>Malik</surname><orcid>0000-0003-4315-5726</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>F. 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spelling 2019-06-12T15:36:14.8917885 v2 29601 2016-08-19 Hierarchical structures of cactus spines that aid in the directional movement of dew droplets d7e74f3c3979dff2baba1a16fe50e24a 0000-0003-4315-5726 Tegwen Malik Tegwen Malik true false 20b93675a5457203ae87ebc32bd6d155 0000-0002-7142-8253 David Gethin David Gethin true false 00d270d085497f5ec1a366f25a730302 Marc Clement Marc Clement true false f5cf40043658d0b8a747ef6224019939 0000-0002-8189-9489 David Beynon David Beynon true false 2016-08-19 BBU Three species of cactus whose spines act as dew harvesters were chosen for this study: Copiapoa cinerea var. haseltoniana, Mammillaria columbiana subsp. yucatanensis and Parodia mammulosa and compared with Ferocactus wislizenii whose spines do not perform as dew harvesters. Time-lapse snapshots of C. cinerea showed movement of dew droplets from spine tips to their base, even against gravity. Spines emanating from one of the areoles of C. cinerea were submerged in water laced with fluorescent nanoparticles and this particular areole with its spines and a small area of stem was removed and imaged. These images clearly showed that fluorescent water had moved into the stem of the plant. Lines of vascular bundles radiating inwards from the surface areoles (from where the spines emanate) to the core of the stem were detected using magnetic resonance imaging, with the exception of F. wislizenii that does not harvest dew on its spines. Spine microstructures were examined using SEM images and surface roughness measurements (Ra and Rz) taken of the spines of C. cinerea. It was found that a roughness gradient created by tapered microgrooves existed that could potentially direct surface water from a spine tip to its base. Journal Article Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences 374 2073 20160110 27 6 2016 2016-06-27 10.1098/rsta.2016.0110 COLLEGE NANME Business COLLEGE CODE BBU Swansea University 2019-06-12T15:36:14.8917885 2016-08-19T13:32:02.4909187 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering Tegwen Malik 0000-0003-4315-5726 1 F. T. Malik 2 R. M. Clement 3 D. T. Gethin 4 M. Kiernan 5 T. Goral 6 P. Griffiths 7 D. Beynon 8 A. R. Parker 9 David Gethin 0000-0002-7142-8253 10 Marc Clement 11 David Beynon 0000-0002-8189-9489 12 0029601-14092016112103.pdf malik2016.pdf 2016-09-14T11:21:03.3170000 Output 1289088 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2017-06-27T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Hierarchical structures of cactus spines that aid in the directional movement of dew droplets
spellingShingle Hierarchical structures of cactus spines that aid in the directional movement of dew droplets
Tegwen Malik
David Gethin
Marc Clement
David Beynon
title_short Hierarchical structures of cactus spines that aid in the directional movement of dew droplets
title_full Hierarchical structures of cactus spines that aid in the directional movement of dew droplets
title_fullStr Hierarchical structures of cactus spines that aid in the directional movement of dew droplets
title_full_unstemmed Hierarchical structures of cactus spines that aid in the directional movement of dew droplets
title_sort Hierarchical structures of cactus spines that aid in the directional movement of dew droplets
author_id_str_mv d7e74f3c3979dff2baba1a16fe50e24a
20b93675a5457203ae87ebc32bd6d155
00d270d085497f5ec1a366f25a730302
f5cf40043658d0b8a747ef6224019939
author_id_fullname_str_mv d7e74f3c3979dff2baba1a16fe50e24a_***_Tegwen Malik
20b93675a5457203ae87ebc32bd6d155_***_David Gethin
00d270d085497f5ec1a366f25a730302_***_Marc Clement
f5cf40043658d0b8a747ef6224019939_***_David Beynon
author Tegwen Malik
David Gethin
Marc Clement
David Beynon
author2 Tegwen Malik
F. T. Malik
R. M. Clement
D. T. Gethin
M. Kiernan
T. Goral
P. Griffiths
D. Beynon
A. R. Parker
David Gethin
Marc Clement
David Beynon
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institution Swansea University
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college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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description Three species of cactus whose spines act as dew harvesters were chosen for this study: Copiapoa cinerea var. haseltoniana, Mammillaria columbiana subsp. yucatanensis and Parodia mammulosa and compared with Ferocactus wislizenii whose spines do not perform as dew harvesters. Time-lapse snapshots of C. cinerea showed movement of dew droplets from spine tips to their base, even against gravity. Spines emanating from one of the areoles of C. cinerea were submerged in water laced with fluorescent nanoparticles and this particular areole with its spines and a small area of stem was removed and imaged. These images clearly showed that fluorescent water had moved into the stem of the plant. Lines of vascular bundles radiating inwards from the surface areoles (from where the spines emanate) to the core of the stem were detected using magnetic resonance imaging, with the exception of F. wislizenii that does not harvest dew on its spines. Spine microstructures were examined using SEM images and surface roughness measurements (Ra and Rz) taken of the spines of C. cinerea. It was found that a roughness gradient created by tapered microgrooves existed that could potentially direct surface water from a spine tip to its base.
published_date 2016-06-27T03:32:32Z
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