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Investigating the feasibility of an enhanced contact intervention in self-harm and suicidal behaviour: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial delivering a Social support and Wellbeing Intervention following Self Harm (SWISH)

Ashra Khanom Orcid Logo, Nilufar Ahmed Orcid Logo, Ann John Orcid Logo, Saiful Islam Orcid Logo, Richard Jones, Pippa Anderson, Charlotte Davies, Ashra Khanom, Shaun Harris, Peter Huxley

BMJ Open, Volume: 6, Issue: 9, Start page: e012043

Swansea University Authors: Ashra Khanom Orcid Logo, Nilufar Ahmed Orcid Logo, Ann John Orcid Logo, Saiful Islam Orcid Logo, Pippa Anderson, Shaun Harris

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Abstract

Introduction: Self harm is a strong predictor for suicide. Risks for repeat behaviour are heightened in the aftermath of an index episode. There is no consensus on the most effective type of intervention to reduce repetition. Treatment options for patients who do not require secondary mental health...

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Published in: BMJ Open
ISSN: 2044-6055
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spelling 2020-09-15T08:23:07.3062615 v2 29706 2016-09-02 Investigating the feasibility of an enhanced contact intervention in self-harm and suicidal behaviour: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial delivering a Social support and Wellbeing Intervention following Self Harm (SWISH) 1f0f14742e3a36e8fd6d29f59374a009 0000-0002-5735-6601 Ashra Khanom Ashra Khanom true false d8d2587d94adcdf31706b9efe04db909 0000-0003-4274-801X Nilufar Ahmed Nilufar Ahmed true false ed8a9c37bd7b7235b762d941ef18ee55 0000-0002-5657-6995 Ann John Ann John true false 4157d27b800a8357873bdfc9c71bd596 0000-0003-3182-8487 Saiful Islam Saiful Islam true false 128cdedfba6e5e6374fdc85d5c78c428 Pippa Anderson Pippa Anderson true false 10b1bd08dbad1f2681ff1e527af9f9a3 Shaun Harris Shaun Harris true false 2016-09-02 HDAT Introduction: Self harm is a strong predictor for suicide. Risks for repeat behaviour are heightened in the aftermath of an index episode. There is no consensus on the most effective type of intervention to reduce repetition. Treatment options for patients who do not require secondary mental health services include: no support, discharge to General Practitioner, or referral to primary care mental health support services. The aim of this study is to assess whether it is feasible to deliver a brief intervention after an episode and whether this can reduce depressive symptoms and increase sense of wellbeing for patients who self harm.Methods: This is a non-blinded parallel group randomised clinical trial. One hundred and twenty patients presenting with self harm and/or suicidal ideation to mental health services over a twelve month period who are not referred to secondary services will be randomised to either intervention plus treatment as usual (TAU), or control (TAU only). Patients are assessed at baseline, 4 weeks and 12 weeks with standardised measures to collect data on depression, wellbeing, and service use. Primary outcome is depression scores; secondary outcomes are wellbeing scores and use of services. The findings will indicate whether a rapid response brief intervention is feasible and can reduce depression and increase wellbeing among patients who self harm and do not require secondary services. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval was granted by the UK National Health Service (NHS) Ethics Committee process (REC 6: 14/WA/0074). The findings of the trial will be disseminated through presentations to the participating Health Board and partners, peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences. Trial registration: The trial is registered with the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Network (ISRCTN 76914248); and UK Clinical Research Network (16229) Journal Article BMJ Open 6 9 e012043 2044-6055 Randomised controlled trial, Self Harm, Suicide, Intervention, Social wellbeing, Social support, Social networks, Depression 0 0 0 0001-01-01 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012043 http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/6/9/e012043 COLLEGE NANME Health Data Science COLLEGE CODE HDAT Swansea University 2020-09-15T08:23:07.3062615 2016-09-02T15:43:40.3931267 College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Social Work and Social Care Research Ashra Khanom 0000-0002-5735-6601 1 Nilufar Ahmed 0000-0003-4274-801X 2 Ann John 0000-0002-5657-6995 3 Saiful Islam 0000-0003-3182-8487 4 Richard Jones 5 Pippa Anderson 6 Charlotte Davies 7 Ashra Khanom 8 Shaun Harris 9 Peter Huxley 10 0029706-29092016171434.pdf BMJOpen2016Ahmed.pdf 2016-09-29T17:14:34.5300000 Output 899571 application/pdf Version of Record true This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ true
title Investigating the feasibility of an enhanced contact intervention in self-harm and suicidal behaviour: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial delivering a Social support and Wellbeing Intervention following Self Harm (SWISH)
spellingShingle Investigating the feasibility of an enhanced contact intervention in self-harm and suicidal behaviour: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial delivering a Social support and Wellbeing Intervention following Self Harm (SWISH)
Ashra Khanom
Nilufar Ahmed
Ann John
Saiful Islam
Pippa Anderson
Shaun Harris
title_short Investigating the feasibility of an enhanced contact intervention in self-harm and suicidal behaviour: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial delivering a Social support and Wellbeing Intervention following Self Harm (SWISH)
title_full Investigating the feasibility of an enhanced contact intervention in self-harm and suicidal behaviour: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial delivering a Social support and Wellbeing Intervention following Self Harm (SWISH)
title_fullStr Investigating the feasibility of an enhanced contact intervention in self-harm and suicidal behaviour: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial delivering a Social support and Wellbeing Intervention following Self Harm (SWISH)
title_full_unstemmed Investigating the feasibility of an enhanced contact intervention in self-harm and suicidal behaviour: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial delivering a Social support and Wellbeing Intervention following Self Harm (SWISH)
title_sort Investigating the feasibility of an enhanced contact intervention in self-harm and suicidal behaviour: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial delivering a Social support and Wellbeing Intervention following Self Harm (SWISH)
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author_id_fullname_str_mv 1f0f14742e3a36e8fd6d29f59374a009_***_Ashra Khanom
d8d2587d94adcdf31706b9efe04db909_***_Nilufar Ahmed
ed8a9c37bd7b7235b762d941ef18ee55_***_Ann John
4157d27b800a8357873bdfc9c71bd596_***_Saiful Islam
128cdedfba6e5e6374fdc85d5c78c428_***_Pippa Anderson
10b1bd08dbad1f2681ff1e527af9f9a3_***_Shaun Harris
author Ashra Khanom
Nilufar Ahmed
Ann John
Saiful Islam
Pippa Anderson
Shaun Harris
author2 Ashra Khanom
Nilufar Ahmed
Ann John
Saiful Islam
Richard Jones
Pippa Anderson
Charlotte Davies
Ashra Khanom
Shaun Harris
Peter Huxley
format Journal article
container_title BMJ Open
container_volume 6
container_issue 9
container_start_page e012043
institution Swansea University
issn 2044-6055
doi_str_mv 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012043
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Centre for Social Work and Social Care Research{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Centre for Social Work and Social Care Research
url http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/6/9/e012043
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description Introduction: Self harm is a strong predictor for suicide. Risks for repeat behaviour are heightened in the aftermath of an index episode. There is no consensus on the most effective type of intervention to reduce repetition. Treatment options for patients who do not require secondary mental health services include: no support, discharge to General Practitioner, or referral to primary care mental health support services. The aim of this study is to assess whether it is feasible to deliver a brief intervention after an episode and whether this can reduce depressive symptoms and increase sense of wellbeing for patients who self harm.Methods: This is a non-blinded parallel group randomised clinical trial. One hundred and twenty patients presenting with self harm and/or suicidal ideation to mental health services over a twelve month period who are not referred to secondary services will be randomised to either intervention plus treatment as usual (TAU), or control (TAU only). Patients are assessed at baseline, 4 weeks and 12 weeks with standardised measures to collect data on depression, wellbeing, and service use. Primary outcome is depression scores; secondary outcomes are wellbeing scores and use of services. The findings will indicate whether a rapid response brief intervention is feasible and can reduce depression and increase wellbeing among patients who self harm and do not require secondary services. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval was granted by the UK National Health Service (NHS) Ethics Committee process (REC 6: 14/WA/0074). The findings of the trial will be disseminated through presentations to the participating Health Board and partners, peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences. Trial registration: The trial is registered with the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Network (ISRCTN 76914248); and UK Clinical Research Network (16229)
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