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Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

Patricia Skinner Orcid Logo

The New Middle Ages

Swansea University Author: Patricia Skinner Orcid Logo

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Abstract

This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interaction...

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Published in: The New Middle Ages
ISBN: 9781349950737 9781137544391
ISSN: 978-1-137-54439-1
Published: New York Palgrave Macmillan US 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa30093
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first_indexed 2017-01-16T15:01:52Z
last_indexed 2021-07-10T02:47:07Z
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spelling 2021-07-09T13:23:17.5005085 v2 30093 2016-09-17 Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe b3dae60df8be2bd4b013434e12d991ea 0000-0002-7388-6645 Patricia Skinner Patricia Skinner true false 2016-09-17 FGHSS This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period. Book The New Middle Ages Palgrave Macmillan US New York 9781349950737 9781137544391 978-1-137-54439-1 medieval, disfigurement, faces, facial injury, stigma, surgery, disfigurement, gender, medicine and health, violence. 1 1 2017 2017-01-01 10.1057/978-1-137-54439-1 https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-54439-1 COLLEGE NANME Humanities and Social Sciences - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGHSS Swansea University Wellcome Trust Wellcome Trust grant number 097469 2021-07-09T13:23:17.5005085 2016-09-17T18:39:49.2426961 College of Arts and Humanities History Patricia Skinner 0000-0002-7388-6645 1 0030093-27102017131929.pdf 10.10572F978-1-137-54439-1.pdf 2017-10-27T13:19:29.0400000 Output 2404779 application/pdf Version of Record true This book is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe
spellingShingle Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe
Patricia Skinner
title_short Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe
title_full Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe
title_fullStr Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe
title_full_unstemmed Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe
title_sort Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe
author_id_str_mv b3dae60df8be2bd4b013434e12d991ea
author_id_fullname_str_mv b3dae60df8be2bd4b013434e12d991ea_***_Patricia Skinner
author Patricia Skinner
author2 Patricia Skinner
format Book
container_title The New Middle Ages
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
isbn 9781349950737
9781137544391
issn 978-1-137-54439-1
doi_str_mv 10.1057/978-1-137-54439-1
publisher Palgrave Macmillan US
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
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hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
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department_str History{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}History
url https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-54439-1
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description This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period.
published_date 2017-01-01T03:41:48Z
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