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The fundamental role of ecological feedback mechanisms for the adaptive management of seagrass ecosystems - a review / Paul S. Maxwell, Johan S. Eklöf, Marieke M. van Katwijk, Katherine R. O'Brien, Maricela de la Torre-Castro, Christoffer Boström, Tjeerd J. Bouma, Dorte Krause-Jensen, Richard Unsworth, Brigitta I. van Tussenbroek, Tjisse van der Heide

Biological Reviews

Swansea University Author: Richard Unsworth

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/brv.12294

Abstract

Seagrass meadows are vital ecosystems in coastal zones worldwide, but are also under global threat. One of the major hurdles restricting the success of seagrass conservation and restoration is our limited understanding of ecological feedback mechanisms. In these ecosystems, multiple, self-reinforcin...

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Published in: Biological Reviews
ISSN: 14647931
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa30235
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first_indexed 2016-09-27T18:58:46Z
last_indexed 2019-08-30T14:04:50Z
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spelling 2019-08-30T11:08:32.3681839 v2 30235 2016-09-27 The fundamental role of ecological feedback mechanisms for the adaptive management of seagrass ecosystems - a review b0f33acd13a3ab541cf2aaea27f4fc2f 0000-0003-0036-9724 Richard Unsworth Richard Unsworth true false 2016-09-27 SBI Seagrass meadows are vital ecosystems in coastal zones worldwide, but are also under global threat. One of the major hurdles restricting the success of seagrass conservation and restoration is our limited understanding of ecological feedback mechanisms. In these ecosystems, multiple, self-reinforcing feedbacks can undermine conservation efforts by masking environmental impacts until the decline is precipitous, or alternatively they can inhibit seagrass recovery in spite of restoration efforts. However, no clear framework yet exists for identifying or dealing with feedbacks to improve the management of seagrass ecosystems. Here we review the causes and consequences of multiple feedbacks between seagrass and biotic and/or abiotic processes. We demonstrate how feedbacks have the potential to impose or reinforce regimes of either seagrass dominance or unvegetated substrate, and how the strength and importance of these feedbacks vary across environmental gradients. Although a myriad of feedbacks have now been identified, the co-occurrence and likely interaction among feedbacks has largely been overlooked to date due to difficulties in analysis and detection. Here we take a fundamental step forward by modelling the interactions among two distinct above- and belowground feedbacks to demonstrate that interacting feedbacks are likely to be important for ecosystem resilience. On this basis, we propose a five-step adaptive management plan to address feedback dynamics for effective conservation and restoration strategies. The management plan provides guidance to aid in the identification and prioritisation of likely feedbacks in different seagrass ecosystems. Journal Article Biological Reviews 14647931 resilience, seagrass, feedbacks, marine 1 9 2016 2016-09-01 10.1111/brv.12294 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2019-08-30T11:08:32.3681839 2016-09-27T15:07:15.1987405 College of Science Biosciences Paul S. Maxwell 1 Johan S. Eklöf 2 Marieke M. van Katwijk 3 Katherine R. O'Brien 4 Maricela de la Torre-Castro 5 Christoffer Boström 6 Tjeerd J. Bouma 7 Dorte Krause-Jensen 8 Richard Unsworth 0000-0003-0036-9724 9 Brigitta I. van Tussenbroek 10 Tjisse van der Heide 11
title The fundamental role of ecological feedback mechanisms for the adaptive management of seagrass ecosystems - a review
spellingShingle The fundamental role of ecological feedback mechanisms for the adaptive management of seagrass ecosystems - a review
Richard, Unsworth
title_short The fundamental role of ecological feedback mechanisms for the adaptive management of seagrass ecosystems - a review
title_full The fundamental role of ecological feedback mechanisms for the adaptive management of seagrass ecosystems - a review
title_fullStr The fundamental role of ecological feedback mechanisms for the adaptive management of seagrass ecosystems - a review
title_full_unstemmed The fundamental role of ecological feedback mechanisms for the adaptive management of seagrass ecosystems - a review
title_sort The fundamental role of ecological feedback mechanisms for the adaptive management of seagrass ecosystems - a review
author_id_str_mv b0f33acd13a3ab541cf2aaea27f4fc2f
author_id_fullname_str_mv b0f33acd13a3ab541cf2aaea27f4fc2f_***_Richard, Unsworth
author Richard, Unsworth
author2 Paul S. Maxwell
Johan S. Eklöf
Marieke M. van Katwijk
Katherine R. O'Brien
Maricela de la Torre-Castro
Christoffer Boström
Tjeerd J. Bouma
Dorte Krause-Jensen
Richard Unsworth
Brigitta I. van Tussenbroek
Tjisse van der Heide
format Journal article
container_title Biological Reviews
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
issn 14647931
doi_str_mv 10.1111/brv.12294
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description Seagrass meadows are vital ecosystems in coastal zones worldwide, but are also under global threat. One of the major hurdles restricting the success of seagrass conservation and restoration is our limited understanding of ecological feedback mechanisms. In these ecosystems, multiple, self-reinforcing feedbacks can undermine conservation efforts by masking environmental impacts until the decline is precipitous, or alternatively they can inhibit seagrass recovery in spite of restoration efforts. However, no clear framework yet exists for identifying or dealing with feedbacks to improve the management of seagrass ecosystems. Here we review the causes and consequences of multiple feedbacks between seagrass and biotic and/or abiotic processes. We demonstrate how feedbacks have the potential to impose or reinforce regimes of either seagrass dominance or unvegetated substrate, and how the strength and importance of these feedbacks vary across environmental gradients. Although a myriad of feedbacks have now been identified, the co-occurrence and likely interaction among feedbacks has largely been overlooked to date due to difficulties in analysis and detection. Here we take a fundamental step forward by modelling the interactions among two distinct above- and belowground feedbacks to demonstrate that interacting feedbacks are likely to be important for ecosystem resilience. On this basis, we propose a five-step adaptive management plan to address feedback dynamics for effective conservation and restoration strategies. The management plan provides guidance to aid in the identification and prioritisation of likely feedbacks in different seagrass ecosystems.
published_date 2016-09-01T03:46:40Z
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