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Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000

Christopher Pretty, Steve Williams, Mark Whittaker Orcid Logo

Materials, Volume: 10, Issue: 1, Start page: 34

Swansea University Author: Mark Whittaker Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/ma10010034

Abstract

Non-isothermal conditions during flight cycles have long led to the requirement for thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) evaluation of aerospace materials. However, the increased temperatures within the gas turbine engine have meant that the requirements for TMF testing now extend to disc alloys along wi...

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Published in: Materials
ISSN: 1996-1944
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa31568
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spelling 2020-07-16T14:34:53.8363519 v2 31568 2017-01-04 Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000 a146c6d442cb2c466d096179f9ac97ca 0000-0002-5854-0726 Mark Whittaker Mark Whittaker true false 2017-01-04 MTLS Non-isothermal conditions during flight cycles have long led to the requirement for thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) evaluation of aerospace materials. However, the increased temperatures within the gas turbine engine have meant that the requirements for TMF testing now extend to disc alloys along with blade materials. As such, fatigue crack growth rates are required to be evaluated under non-isothermal conditions along with the development of a detailed understanding of related failure mechanisms. In the current work, a TMF crack growth testing method has been developed utilising induction heating and direct current potential drop techniques for polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys, such as RR1000. Results have shown that in-phase (IP) testing produces accelerated crack growth rates compared with out-of-phase (OOP) due to increased temperature at peak stress and therefore increased time dependent crack growth. The ordering of the crack growth rates is supported by detailed fractographic analysis which shows intergranular crack growth in IP test specimens, and transgranular crack growth in 90° OOP and 180° OOP tests. Isothermal tests have also been carried out for comparison of crack growth rates at the point of peak stress in the TMF cycles. Journal Article Materials 10 1 34 1996-1944 4 1 2017 2017-01-04 10.3390/ma10010034 COLLEGE NANME Materials Science and Engineering COLLEGE CODE MTLS Swansea University 2020-07-16T14:34:53.8363519 2017-01-04T15:02:23.1357527 College of Engineering Engineering Christopher Pretty 1 Steve Williams 2 Mark Whittaker 0000-0002-5854-0726 3 0031568-04012017150333.pdf pretty2016.pdf 2017-01-04T15:03:33.8000000 Output 11251353 application/pdf Version of Record true 2017-01-04T00:00:00.0000000 This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited true
title Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000
spellingShingle Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000
Mark Whittaker
title_short Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000
title_full Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000
title_fullStr Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000
title_full_unstemmed Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000
title_sort Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000
author_id_str_mv a146c6d442cb2c466d096179f9ac97ca
author_id_fullname_str_mv a146c6d442cb2c466d096179f9ac97ca_***_Mark Whittaker
author Mark Whittaker
author2 Christopher Pretty
Steve Williams
Mark Whittaker
format Journal article
container_title Materials
container_volume 10
container_issue 1
container_start_page 34
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 1996-1944
doi_str_mv 10.3390/ma10010034
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
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description Non-isothermal conditions during flight cycles have long led to the requirement for thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) evaluation of aerospace materials. However, the increased temperatures within the gas turbine engine have meant that the requirements for TMF testing now extend to disc alloys along with blade materials. As such, fatigue crack growth rates are required to be evaluated under non-isothermal conditions along with the development of a detailed understanding of related failure mechanisms. In the current work, a TMF crack growth testing method has been developed utilising induction heating and direct current potential drop techniques for polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys, such as RR1000. Results have shown that in-phase (IP) testing produces accelerated crack growth rates compared with out-of-phase (OOP) due to increased temperature at peak stress and therefore increased time dependent crack growth. The ordering of the crack growth rates is supported by detailed fractographic analysis which shows intergranular crack growth in IP test specimens, and transgranular crack growth in 90° OOP and 180° OOP tests. Isothermal tests have also been carried out for comparison of crack growth rates at the point of peak stress in the TMF cycles.
published_date 2017-01-04T03:43:25Z
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