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Regional pay? The public/private sector pay differential / David Blackaby; Philip Murphy; Nigel O’Leary; Anita Staneva; Nigel O'Leary

Regional Studies, Pages: 1 - 13

Swansea University Authors: David, Blackaby, Nigel, O'Leary

Abstract

This paper extends the debate on making public sector wages more responsive to those in the private sector. The way in which the public/private sector wage differential is calculated dramatically alters conclusions and far from there being substantial regional disparity in wages offered to public se...

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Published in: Regional Studies
ISSN: 0034-3404 1360-0591
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa33663
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first_indexed 2017-05-12T19:01:56Z
last_indexed 2020-09-05T02:52:53Z
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spelling 2020-09-04T19:48:18.6154549 v2 33663 2017-05-12 Regional pay? The public/private sector pay differential 5b6a72a296cd534a451b536138325251 0000-0003-4888-4231 David Blackaby David Blackaby true false fb1a5569008b44e42a4c63a3f971bd29 0000-0002-5971-9306 Nigel O'Leary Nigel O'Leary true false 2017-05-12 BEC This paper extends the debate on making public sector wages more responsive to those in the private sector. The way in which the public/private sector wage differential is calculated dramatically alters conclusions and far from there being substantial regional disparity in wages offered to public sector workers, any differences are predominantly concentrated in London and the South East where public sector workers are significantly disadvantaged relative to private sector workers. This has implications for staff recruitment and retention. Such findings question the need for regional market-facing pay but highlight the necessity to revisit the London-weighting offered to public sector workers. Journal Article Regional Studies 1 13 0034-3404 1360-0591 regional pay, public sector, wage differentials 1 6 2018 2018-06-01 10.1080/00343404.2017.1331295 COLLEGE NANME Economics COLLEGE CODE BEC Swansea University ESRC 2020-09-04T19:48:18.6154549 2017-05-12T13:33:55.6952873 School of Management Economics David Blackaby 0000-0003-4888-4231 1 Philip Murphy 2 Nigel O’Leary 3 Anita Staneva 4 Nigel O'Leary 0000-0002-5971-9306 5 0033663-12052017133553.pdf Regional_Pay-final_version_for_Cronfa.pdf 2017-05-12T13:35:53.5070000 Output 572030 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-12-28T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Regional pay? The public/private sector pay differential
spellingShingle Regional pay? The public/private sector pay differential
David, Blackaby
Nigel, O'Leary
title_short Regional pay? The public/private sector pay differential
title_full Regional pay? The public/private sector pay differential
title_fullStr Regional pay? The public/private sector pay differential
title_full_unstemmed Regional pay? The public/private sector pay differential
title_sort Regional pay? The public/private sector pay differential
author_id_str_mv 5b6a72a296cd534a451b536138325251
fb1a5569008b44e42a4c63a3f971bd29
author_id_fullname_str_mv 5b6a72a296cd534a451b536138325251_***_David, Blackaby
fb1a5569008b44e42a4c63a3f971bd29_***_Nigel, O'Leary
author David, Blackaby
Nigel, O'Leary
author2 David Blackaby
Philip Murphy
Nigel O’Leary
Anita Staneva
Nigel O'Leary
format Journal article
container_title Regional Studies
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publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 0034-3404
1360-0591
doi_str_mv 10.1080/00343404.2017.1331295
college_str School of Management
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hierarchy_top_title School of Management
hierarchy_parent_id schoolofmanagement
hierarchy_parent_title School of Management
department_str Economics{{{_:::_}}}School of Management{{{_:::_}}}Economics
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description This paper extends the debate on making public sector wages more responsive to those in the private sector. The way in which the public/private sector wage differential is calculated dramatically alters conclusions and far from there being substantial regional disparity in wages offered to public sector workers, any differences are predominantly concentrated in London and the South East where public sector workers are significantly disadvantaged relative to private sector workers. This has implications for staff recruitment and retention. Such findings question the need for regional market-facing pay but highlight the necessity to revisit the London-weighting offered to public sector workers.
published_date 2018-06-01T03:45:28Z
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score 10.759819