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The effect of ventricular assist device-associated biomaterials on human blood leukocytes / Gemma Radley; Ina Laura Pieper; Catherine A. Thornton

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials

Swansea University Author: Thornton, Catherine

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/jbm.b.33981

Abstract

Background: Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are an effective bridging or destination therapy for patients with advanced stage heart failure. These devices remain susceptible to adverse events including infection, bleeding, and thrombus; events linked to the foreign body response. Therefore, the bi...

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Published in: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials
ISSN: 15524973
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa34948
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Abstract: Background: Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are an effective bridging or destination therapy for patients with advanced stage heart failure. These devices remain susceptible to adverse events including infection, bleeding, and thrombus; events linked to the foreign body response. Therefore, the biocompatibility of all biomaterials used is crucial to the success of medical devices.Methods: Biomaterials common in VADs - DLC: diamond-like carbon coated stainless steel; Sap: single-crystal sapphire; SiN: silicon nitride; Ti: titanium alloy; and ZTA: zirconia-toughened alumina - were tested for their biocompatibility through incubation with whole human blood for 2 hours with mild agitation. Blood was then removed and used for: complete cell counts; leukocyte activation and death, and the production of key inflammatory cytokines. All were compared to time 0 and an un-exposed 2 hour sample.Results: Monocyte numbers were lower after exposure to DLC, SiN and ZTA and monocytes showed evidence of activation with DLC, Sap, and SiN. Neutrophils and lymphocytes were unaffected.Conclusions: This approach allows comprehensive analysis of the potential blood damaging effects of biomaterials. Monocyte activation by DLC, Sap, ZTA and SiN warrants further investigation linking effects on this cell type to unfavourable inflammatory/thrombogenic responses to VADs and other blood handling devices.
Keywords: Ventricular Assist Devices; Biomaterials; Human; Blood; Flow Cytometry
College: Swansea University Medical School