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Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training

Richard Metcalfe Orcid Logo, John A. Babraj, Samantha G. Fawkner, Niels B. J. Vollaard

European Journal of Applied Physiology, Volume: 112, Issue: 7, Pages: 2767 - 2775

Swansea University Author: Richard Metcalfe Orcid Logo

Abstract

High-intensity interval training (HIT) has been proposed as a time-efficient alternative to traditional cardiorespiratory exercise training, but is very fatiguing. In this study, we investigated the effects of a reduced-exertion HIT (REHIT) exercise intervention on insulin sensitivity and aerobic ca...

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Published in: European Journal of Applied Physiology
ISSN: 1439-6319 1439-6327
Published: 2012
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa35653
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spelling 2017-10-05T15:29:32.8110115 v2 35653 2017-09-26 Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf 0000-0003-0980-2977 Richard Metcalfe Richard Metcalfe true false 2017-09-26 STSC High-intensity interval training (HIT) has been proposed as a time-efficient alternative to traditional cardiorespiratory exercise training, but is very fatiguing. In this study, we investigated the effects of a reduced-exertion HIT (REHIT) exercise intervention on insulin sensitivity and aerobic capacity. Twenty-nine healthy but sedentary young men and women were randomly assigned to the REHIT intervention (men, n = 7; women, n = 8) or a control group (men, n = 6; women, n = 8). Subjects assigned to the control groups maintained their normal sedentary lifestyle, whilst subjects in the training groups completed three exercise sessions per week for 6 weeks. The 10-min exercise sessions consisted of low-intensity cycling (60 W) and one (first session) or two (all other sessions) brief ‘all-out’ sprints (10 s in week 1, 15 s in weeks 2–3 and 20 s in the final 3 weeks). Aerobic capacity ( V˙O2peakV˙O2peak ) and the glucose and insulin response to a 75-g glucose load (OGTT) were determined before and 3 days after the exercise program. Despite relatively low ratings of perceived exertion (RPE 13 ± 1), insulin sensitivity significantly increased by 28% in the male training group following the REHIT intervention (P < 0.05). V˙O2peakV˙O2peak increased in the male training (+15%) and female training (+12%) groups (P < 0.01). In conclusion we show that a novel, feasible exercise intervention can improve metabolic health and aerobic capacity. REHIT may offer a genuinely time-efficient alternative to HIT and conventional cardiorespiratory exercise training for improving risk factors of T2D. Journal Article European Journal of Applied Physiology 112 7 2767 2775 1439-6319 1439-6327 Exercise, Insulin Sensitivity, Interval Training, Aerobic Capacity 1 7 2012 2012-07-01 10.1007/s00421-011-2254-z https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00421-011-2254-z COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2017-10-05T15:29:32.8110115 2017-09-26T13:10:57.4818900 College of Engineering Engineering Richard Metcalfe 0000-0003-0980-2977 1 John A. Babraj 2 Samantha G. Fawkner 3 Niels B. J. Vollaard 4 0035653-29092017094508.pdf Metcalfeetal2011revised.pdf 2017-09-29T09:45:08.4400000 Output 439152 application/pdf Author's Original true 2017-09-29T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training
spellingShingle Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training
Richard Metcalfe
title_short Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training
title_full Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training
title_fullStr Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training
title_full_unstemmed Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training
title_sort Towards the minimal amount of exercise for improving metabolic health: beneficial effects of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training
author_id_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf_***_Richard Metcalfe
author Richard Metcalfe
author2 Richard Metcalfe
John A. Babraj
Samantha G. Fawkner
Niels B. J. Vollaard
format Journal article
container_title European Journal of Applied Physiology
container_volume 112
container_issue 7
container_start_page 2767
publishDate 2012
institution Swansea University
issn 1439-6319
1439-6327
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s00421-011-2254-z
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
url https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00421-011-2254-z
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description High-intensity interval training (HIT) has been proposed as a time-efficient alternative to traditional cardiorespiratory exercise training, but is very fatiguing. In this study, we investigated the effects of a reduced-exertion HIT (REHIT) exercise intervention on insulin sensitivity and aerobic capacity. Twenty-nine healthy but sedentary young men and women were randomly assigned to the REHIT intervention (men, n = 7; women, n = 8) or a control group (men, n = 6; women, n = 8). Subjects assigned to the control groups maintained their normal sedentary lifestyle, whilst subjects in the training groups completed three exercise sessions per week for 6 weeks. The 10-min exercise sessions consisted of low-intensity cycling (60 W) and one (first session) or two (all other sessions) brief ‘all-out’ sprints (10 s in week 1, 15 s in weeks 2–3 and 20 s in the final 3 weeks). Aerobic capacity ( V˙O2peakV˙O2peak ) and the glucose and insulin response to a 75-g glucose load (OGTT) were determined before and 3 days after the exercise program. Despite relatively low ratings of perceived exertion (RPE 13 ± 1), insulin sensitivity significantly increased by 28% in the male training group following the REHIT intervention (P < 0.05). V˙O2peakV˙O2peak increased in the male training (+15%) and female training (+12%) groups (P < 0.01). In conclusion we show that a novel, feasible exercise intervention can improve metabolic health and aerobic capacity. REHIT may offer a genuinely time-efficient alternative to HIT and conventional cardiorespiratory exercise training for improving risk factors of T2D.
published_date 2012-07-01T03:48:32Z
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