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Changes in aerobic capacity and glycaemic control in response to reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) are not different between sedentary men and women / Richard Metcalfe, Nicolas Tardif, Dylan Thompson, Niels B.J. Vollaard

Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Volume: 41, Issue: 11, Pages: 1117 - 1123

Swansea University Author: Richard Metcalfe

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DOI (Published version): 10.1139/apnm-2016-0253

Abstract

Previously it has been reported that reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT; total training time of 3 × 10 min per week) improves maximal aerobic capacity in both sedentary men and women, but improves insulin sensitivity in men only. The aim of the present study was to determine wh...

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Published in: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
ISSN: 1715-5312 1715-5320
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa35656
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spelling 2020-07-14T14:32:35.3453385 v2 35656 2017-09-26 Changes in aerobic capacity and glycaemic control in response to reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) are not different between sedentary men and women 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf 0000-0003-0980-2977 Richard Metcalfe Richard Metcalfe true false 2017-09-26 STSC Previously it has been reported that reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT; total training time of 3 × 10 min per week) improves maximal aerobic capacity in both sedentary men and women, but improves insulin sensitivity in men only. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there is a true sex difference in response to REHIT, or that these findings can be explained by the large interindividual variability in response inherent to all exercise training. Thirty-five sedentary participants (18 women; mean ± SD age for men and women, respectively: age, 33 ± 9 and 36 ± 9 years; body mass index, 25.1 ± 2.1 and 24.1 ± 3.5 kg·m−2; maximal aerobic capacity, 38.6 ± 8.3 and 31.6 ± 4.6 mL·kg−1·min−1) completed a 6-week REHIT programme consisting of eighteen 10-min unloaded cycling sessions with 1 (first session) or 2 (all other sessions) “all-out” 10–20-s sprints against a resistance of 5% of body mass. Maximal aerobic capacity and oral glucose tolerance test-derived insulin sensitivity were determined before and after training. REHIT was associated with an increase in maximal aerobic capacity (2.54 ± 0.65 vs. 2.78 ± 0.68 L·min−1, main effect of time: p &#60; 0.01), a trend toward reduced plasma insulin area-under-the-curve (AUC; 6.7 ± 4.8 vs. 6.1 ± 4.0 IU·min−1·mL−1, p = 0.096), but no significant change in plasma glucose AUC or the Cederholm index of insulin sensitivity. Substantial interindividual variability in response to REHIT was observed for all variables, but there was no significant effect of sex. In conclusion, REHIT improves the key health marker of aerobic capacity within a minimal total training time-commitment. There is large interindividual variability in responses to REHIT, but sex differences in the responses are not apparent. Journal Article Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 41 11 1117 1123 1715-5312 1715-5320 HIT, V̇O2max, insulin sensitivity, sex differences 1 11 2016 2016-11-01 10.1139/apnm-2016-0253 http://opus.bath.ac.uk/52430/ COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-07-14T14:32:35.3453385 2017-09-26T13:21:09.2424725 College of Engineering Engineering Richard Metcalfe 0000-0003-0980-2977 1 Nicolas Tardif 2 Dylan Thompson 3 Niels B.J. Vollaard 4 35656__6736__f9aea43ec47e4c039d1c5cf418cf68e6.pdf Metcalfe_et_al_2016_APNM_accepted(1).pdf 2017-09-29T09:52:53.5600000 Output 440804 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2017-09-29T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title Changes in aerobic capacity and glycaemic control in response to reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) are not different between sedentary men and women
spellingShingle Changes in aerobic capacity and glycaemic control in response to reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) are not different between sedentary men and women
Richard, Metcalfe
title_short Changes in aerobic capacity and glycaemic control in response to reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) are not different between sedentary men and women
title_full Changes in aerobic capacity and glycaemic control in response to reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) are not different between sedentary men and women
title_fullStr Changes in aerobic capacity and glycaemic control in response to reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) are not different between sedentary men and women
title_full_unstemmed Changes in aerobic capacity and glycaemic control in response to reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) are not different between sedentary men and women
title_sort Changes in aerobic capacity and glycaemic control in response to reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) are not different between sedentary men and women
author_id_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf_***_Richard, Metcalfe
author Richard, Metcalfe
author2 Richard Metcalfe
Nicolas Tardif
Dylan Thompson
Niels B.J. Vollaard
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url http://opus.bath.ac.uk/52430/
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description Previously it has been reported that reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT; total training time of 3 × 10 min per week) improves maximal aerobic capacity in both sedentary men and women, but improves insulin sensitivity in men only. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there is a true sex difference in response to REHIT, or that these findings can be explained by the large interindividual variability in response inherent to all exercise training. Thirty-five sedentary participants (18 women; mean ± SD age for men and women, respectively: age, 33 ± 9 and 36 ± 9 years; body mass index, 25.1 ± 2.1 and 24.1 ± 3.5 kg·m−2; maximal aerobic capacity, 38.6 ± 8.3 and 31.6 ± 4.6 mL·kg−1·min−1) completed a 6-week REHIT programme consisting of eighteen 10-min unloaded cycling sessions with 1 (first session) or 2 (all other sessions) “all-out” 10–20-s sprints against a resistance of 5% of body mass. Maximal aerobic capacity and oral glucose tolerance test-derived insulin sensitivity were determined before and after training. REHIT was associated with an increase in maximal aerobic capacity (2.54 ± 0.65 vs. 2.78 ± 0.68 L·min−1, main effect of time: p &#60; 0.01), a trend toward reduced plasma insulin area-under-the-curve (AUC; 6.7 ± 4.8 vs. 6.1 ± 4.0 IU·min−1·mL−1, p = 0.096), but no significant change in plasma glucose AUC or the Cederholm index of insulin sensitivity. Substantial interindividual variability in response to REHIT was observed for all variables, but there was no significant effect of sex. In conclusion, REHIT improves the key health marker of aerobic capacity within a minimal total training time-commitment. There is large interindividual variability in responses to REHIT, but sex differences in the responses are not apparent.
published_date 2016-11-01T03:56:08Z
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