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Effect of Number of Sprints in an SIT Session on Change in V˙O2max / Richard, Metcalfe

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Volume: 49, Issue: 6, Pages: 1147 - 1156

Swansea University Author: Richard, Metcalfe

Abstract

Purpose: Recent meta-analyses indicate that sprint interval training (SIT) improves cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙ O2max), but the effects of various training parameters on the magnitude of the improvement remain unknown. The present meta-analysis examined the modifying effect of the number of sprint...

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Published in: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
ISSN: 0195-9131
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa35658
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spelling 2019-03-12T17:03:08.9779816 v2 35658 2017-09-26 Effect of Number of Sprints in an SIT Session on Change in V˙O2max 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf 0000-0003-0980-2977 Richard Metcalfe Richard Metcalfe true false 2017-09-26 STSC Purpose: Recent meta-analyses indicate that sprint interval training (SIT) improves cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙ O2max), but the effects of various training parameters on the magnitude of the improvement remain unknown. The present meta-analysis examined the modifying effect of the number of sprint repetitions in an SITsession on improvements in V˙ O2max. Methods: The databases PubMed and Web of Science were searched for original studies that have examined pre- and posttraining V˙ O2max in adults after Q2 wk of training consisting of repeated (Q2) Wingate-type cycle sprints, published up to May 1, 2016. Articles were excluded if they were not in English; if they involved patients, athletes, or participants with a mean baseline V˙ O2max of 955 mLIkgj1 Iminj1 or a mean age G18 yr; and if an SIT trial was combined with another intervention or used intervals shorter than 10 s. A total of 38 SIT trials from 34 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Probabilistic magnitude-based inferences were made to interpret the outcome of the analysis. Results: The meta-analysis revealed a likely large effect of a typical SIT intervention on V˙ O2max (mean T 90% confidence limits = 7.8% T 4.0%) with a possibly small modifying effect of the maximum number of sprint repetitions in a training session (j1.2% T 0.8% decrease per two additional sprint repetitions). Apart from possibly small effects of baseline V˙ O2max and age, all other modifying effects were unclear or trivial. Conclusion: We conclude that the improvement in V˙ O2max with SIT is not attenuated with fewer sprint repetitions, and possibly even enhanced. This means that SIT protocols can be made more time efficient, which may help SIT to be developed into a viable strategy to impact public health. Journal Article Medicine &amp; Science in Sports &amp; Exercise 49 6 1147 1156 0195-9131 SYSTEMATIC REVIEW, CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS, AEROBIC CAPACITY, SPRINT INTERVAL TRAINING 1 6 2017 2017-06-01 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001204 COLLEGE NANME Sports Science COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2019-03-12T17:03:08.9779816 2017-09-26T13:26:01.1216293 College of Engineering Engineering NIELS B. J. VOLLAARD 1 Richard Metcalfe 0000-0003-0980-2977 2 SEAN WILLIAMS 3 0035658-29092017101414.pdf VollaardMSSEFinal.pdf 2017-09-29T10:14:14.7230000 Output 815365 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-06-01T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title Effect of Number of Sprints in an SIT Session on Change in V˙O2max
spellingShingle Effect of Number of Sprints in an SIT Session on Change in V˙O2max
Richard, Metcalfe
title_short Effect of Number of Sprints in an SIT Session on Change in V˙O2max
title_full Effect of Number of Sprints in an SIT Session on Change in V˙O2max
title_fullStr Effect of Number of Sprints in an SIT Session on Change in V˙O2max
title_full_unstemmed Effect of Number of Sprints in an SIT Session on Change in V˙O2max
title_sort Effect of Number of Sprints in an SIT Session on Change in V˙O2max
author_id_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf_***_Richard, Metcalfe
author Richard, Metcalfe
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container_title Medicine &amp; Science in Sports &amp; Exercise
container_volume 49
container_issue 6
container_start_page 1147
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 0195-9131
doi_str_mv 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001204
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
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description Purpose: Recent meta-analyses indicate that sprint interval training (SIT) improves cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙ O2max), but the effects of various training parameters on the magnitude of the improvement remain unknown. The present meta-analysis examined the modifying effect of the number of sprint repetitions in an SITsession on improvements in V˙ O2max. Methods: The databases PubMed and Web of Science were searched for original studies that have examined pre- and posttraining V˙ O2max in adults after Q2 wk of training consisting of repeated (Q2) Wingate-type cycle sprints, published up to May 1, 2016. Articles were excluded if they were not in English; if they involved patients, athletes, or participants with a mean baseline V˙ O2max of 955 mLIkgj1 Iminj1 or a mean age G18 yr; and if an SIT trial was combined with another intervention or used intervals shorter than 10 s. A total of 38 SIT trials from 34 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Probabilistic magnitude-based inferences were made to interpret the outcome of the analysis. Results: The meta-analysis revealed a likely large effect of a typical SIT intervention on V˙ O2max (mean T 90% confidence limits = 7.8% T 4.0%) with a possibly small modifying effect of the maximum number of sprint repetitions in a training session (j1.2% T 0.8% decrease per two additional sprint repetitions). Apart from possibly small effects of baseline V˙ O2max and age, all other modifying effects were unclear or trivial. Conclusion: We conclude that the improvement in V˙ O2max with SIT is not attenuated with fewer sprint repetitions, and possibly even enhanced. This means that SIT protocols can be made more time efficient, which may help SIT to be developed into a viable strategy to impact public health.
published_date 2017-06-01T04:19:31Z
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