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Control of collagen gel mechanical properties through manipulation of gelation conditions near the sol–gel transition / A. J. Holder, N. Badiei, Karl Hawkins, Christopher Wright, Rhodri Williams, Daniel Curtis

Soft Matter, Volume: 14, Pages: 574 - 580

Swansea University Authors: Karl Hawkins, Christopher Wright, Rhodri Williams, Daniel Curtis

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DOI (Published version): 10.1039/C7SM01933E

Abstract

The ability to control the mechanical properties of cell culture environments is known to influence cell morphology, motility, invasion and differentiation. The present work shows that it is possible to control the mechanical properties of collagen gels by manipulating gelation conditions near the s...

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Published in: Soft Matter
ISSN: 1744-683X 1744-6848
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa36407
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spelling 2020-12-18T10:50:16.8808513 v2 36407 2017-10-30 Control of collagen gel mechanical properties through manipulation of gelation conditions near the sol–gel transition 77c39404a9a98c6e2283d84815cba053 0000-0003-0174-4151 Karl Hawkins Karl Hawkins true false 235e125ac3463e2ee7fc98604bf879ce 0000-0003-2375-8159 Christopher Wright Christopher Wright true false 642bf793695f412ed932f1ea4d9bc3f1 0000-0002-6912-5288 Rhodri Williams Rhodri Williams true false e76ff28a23af2fe37099c4e9a24c1e58 0000-0002-6955-0524 Daniel Curtis Daniel Curtis true false 2017-10-30 BMS The ability to control the mechanical properties of cell culture environments is known to influence cell morphology, motility, invasion and differentiation. The present work shows that it is possible to control the mechanical properties of collagen gels by manipulating gelation conditions near the sol gel transition. This manipulation is accomplished by performing gelation in two stages at different temperatures. The mechanical properties of the gel are found to be strongly dependent on the duration and temperature of the first stage. In the second stage the system is quickly depleted of free collagen which self assembles into a highly branched network characteristic of gelation at the higher temperature (37 °C). An important aspect of the present work is the use of advanced rheometric techniques to assess the transition point between viscoelastic liquid and viscoelastic solid behaviour which occurs upon establishment of a sample spanning network at the gel point. The gel time at the stage I temperature is found to indicate the minimum time that the gelling collagen sample must spend under stage I conditions before the two stage gelation procedure generates an enhancement of mechanical properties. Further, the Fractional Maxwell Model is found to provide an excellent description of the time-dependent mechanical properties of the mature collagen gels. Journal Article Soft Matter 14 574 580 1744-683X 1744-6848 15 1 2018 2018-01-15 10.1039/C7SM01933E COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Sciences COLLEGE CODE BMS Swansea University RCUK, EP/H045848/1 2020-12-18T10:50:16.8808513 2017-10-30T10:43:47.8084179 College of Engineering Engineering A. J. Holder 1 N. Badiei 2 Karl Hawkins 0000-0003-0174-4151 3 Christopher Wright 0000-0003-2375-8159 4 Rhodri Williams 0000-0002-6912-5288 5 Daniel Curtis 0000-0002-6955-0524 6 36407__17618__c43e705779554affa40b6915d1826878.pdf 36407.pdf 2020-07-01T14:47:04.4931836 Output 2319853 application/pdf Version of Record true This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. true eng
title Control of collagen gel mechanical properties through manipulation of gelation conditions near the sol–gel transition
spellingShingle Control of collagen gel mechanical properties through manipulation of gelation conditions near the sol–gel transition
Karl, Hawkins
Christopher, Wright
Rhodri, Williams
Daniel, Curtis
title_short Control of collagen gel mechanical properties through manipulation of gelation conditions near the sol–gel transition
title_full Control of collagen gel mechanical properties through manipulation of gelation conditions near the sol–gel transition
title_fullStr Control of collagen gel mechanical properties through manipulation of gelation conditions near the sol–gel transition
title_full_unstemmed Control of collagen gel mechanical properties through manipulation of gelation conditions near the sol–gel transition
title_sort Control of collagen gel mechanical properties through manipulation of gelation conditions near the sol–gel transition
author_id_str_mv 77c39404a9a98c6e2283d84815cba053
235e125ac3463e2ee7fc98604bf879ce
642bf793695f412ed932f1ea4d9bc3f1
e76ff28a23af2fe37099c4e9a24c1e58
author_id_fullname_str_mv 77c39404a9a98c6e2283d84815cba053_***_Karl, Hawkins
235e125ac3463e2ee7fc98604bf879ce_***_Christopher, Wright
642bf793695f412ed932f1ea4d9bc3f1_***_Rhodri, Williams
e76ff28a23af2fe37099c4e9a24c1e58_***_Daniel, Curtis
author Karl, Hawkins
Christopher, Wright
Rhodri, Williams
Daniel, Curtis
author2 A. J. Holder
N. Badiei
Karl Hawkins
Christopher Wright
Rhodri Williams
Daniel Curtis
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container_title Soft Matter
container_volume 14
container_start_page 574
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 1744-683X
1744-6848
doi_str_mv 10.1039/C7SM01933E
college_str College of Engineering
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description The ability to control the mechanical properties of cell culture environments is known to influence cell morphology, motility, invasion and differentiation. The present work shows that it is possible to control the mechanical properties of collagen gels by manipulating gelation conditions near the sol gel transition. This manipulation is accomplished by performing gelation in two stages at different temperatures. The mechanical properties of the gel are found to be strongly dependent on the duration and temperature of the first stage. In the second stage the system is quickly depleted of free collagen which self assembles into a highly branched network characteristic of gelation at the higher temperature (37 °C). An important aspect of the present work is the use of advanced rheometric techniques to assess the transition point between viscoelastic liquid and viscoelastic solid behaviour which occurs upon establishment of a sample spanning network at the gel point. The gel time at the stage I temperature is found to indicate the minimum time that the gelling collagen sample must spend under stage I conditions before the two stage gelation procedure generates an enhancement of mechanical properties. Further, the Fractional Maxwell Model is found to provide an excellent description of the time-dependent mechanical properties of the mature collagen gels.
published_date 2018-01-15T03:55:09Z
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