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Can a hybrid RO-Freeze process lead to sustainable water supplies?

Mansour Ahmad, Darren Oatley-Radcliffe Orcid Logo, Paul Williams Orcid Logo

Desalination, Volume: 431, Pages: 140 - 150

Swansea University Authors: Darren Oatley-Radcliffe Orcid Logo, Paul Williams Orcid Logo

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Abstract

In this paper we investigate the potential for using suspension crystallisation for the production of clean drinking water from a seawater source. The experimental results show that the produced water from the suspension crystallisation plant not only meets water quality standards but is comparable...

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Published in: Desalination
ISSN: 0011-9164
Published: 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa36713
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first_indexed 2017-11-10T20:01:40Z
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spelling 2021-01-14T12:53:46.8112056 v2 36713 2017-11-10 Can a hybrid RO-Freeze process lead to sustainable water supplies? 6dfb5ec2932455c778a5aa168c18cffd 0000-0003-4116-723X Darren Oatley-Radcliffe Darren Oatley-Radcliffe true false 3ed8f1e5d997e0fcb256fb6501605cec 0000-0003-0511-4659 Paul Williams Paul Williams true false 2017-11-10 CHEG In this paper we investigate the potential for using suspension crystallisation for the production of clean drinking water from a seawater source. The experimental results show that the produced water from the suspension crystallisation plant not only meets water quality standards but is comparable in ionic composition to premier bottled water from around the globe. The experimental results obtained from a pilot scale suspension crystallisation unit showed that the achievable water recovery was around 41% and the salt rejection ratio reached over 99%, which is comparable with most desalination technologies. Moreover, a hybrid RO-Freeze plant has been proposed that is capable of significantly increasing the potable product water that could be achieved by RO alone (~ 400% increase), while simultaneously concentrating the RO brine (used as feed water) producing a super brine of ~ 13 wt%. While there is a cost to this additional process in terms of capital and energy that must be quantified, the obvious increase in water harvest and reduction in residual brine quantity lead to a very attractive desalination process. If the energy demands are acceptable, then this technology could lead to a more sustainable water future. Journal Article Desalination 431 140 150 0011-9164 Desalination; Freeze; Brine; Reverse osmosis; Membranes; Suspension crystallisation 1 4 2018 2018-04-01 10.1016/j.desal.2017.10.031 COLLEGE NANME Chemical Engineering COLLEGE CODE CHEG Swansea University 2021-01-14T12:53:46.8112056 2017-11-10T14:40:25.4590773 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Chemical Engineering Mansour Ahmad 1 Darren Oatley-Radcliffe 0000-0003-4116-723X 2 Paul Williams 0000-0003-0511-4659 3 0036713-14112017150105.pdf ahmad2017.pdf 2017-11-14T15:01:05.5470000 Output 1090474 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-11-09T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC-BY-NC-ND). true eng
title Can a hybrid RO-Freeze process lead to sustainable water supplies?
spellingShingle Can a hybrid RO-Freeze process lead to sustainable water supplies?
Darren Oatley-Radcliffe
Paul Williams
title_short Can a hybrid RO-Freeze process lead to sustainable water supplies?
title_full Can a hybrid RO-Freeze process lead to sustainable water supplies?
title_fullStr Can a hybrid RO-Freeze process lead to sustainable water supplies?
title_full_unstemmed Can a hybrid RO-Freeze process lead to sustainable water supplies?
title_sort Can a hybrid RO-Freeze process lead to sustainable water supplies?
author_id_str_mv 6dfb5ec2932455c778a5aa168c18cffd
3ed8f1e5d997e0fcb256fb6501605cec
author_id_fullname_str_mv 6dfb5ec2932455c778a5aa168c18cffd_***_Darren Oatley-Radcliffe
3ed8f1e5d997e0fcb256fb6501605cec_***_Paul Williams
author Darren Oatley-Radcliffe
Paul Williams
author2 Mansour Ahmad
Darren Oatley-Radcliffe
Paul Williams
format Journal article
container_title Desalination
container_volume 431
container_start_page 140
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 0011-9164
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.desal.2017.10.031
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Chemical Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Chemical Engineering
document_store_str 1
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description In this paper we investigate the potential for using suspension crystallisation for the production of clean drinking water from a seawater source. The experimental results show that the produced water from the suspension crystallisation plant not only meets water quality standards but is comparable in ionic composition to premier bottled water from around the globe. The experimental results obtained from a pilot scale suspension crystallisation unit showed that the achievable water recovery was around 41% and the salt rejection ratio reached over 99%, which is comparable with most desalination technologies. Moreover, a hybrid RO-Freeze plant has been proposed that is capable of significantly increasing the potable product water that could be achieved by RO alone (~ 400% increase), while simultaneously concentrating the RO brine (used as feed water) producing a super brine of ~ 13 wt%. While there is a cost to this additional process in terms of capital and energy that must be quantified, the obvious increase in water harvest and reduction in residual brine quantity lead to a very attractive desalination process. If the energy demands are acceptable, then this technology could lead to a more sustainable water future.
published_date 2018-04-01T03:44:13Z
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