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Journal article 265 views 46 downloads

On the behaviour of lung tissue under tension and compression / Hari, Arora

Scientific Reports, Volume: 6, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Hari, Arora

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DOI (Published version): 10.1038/srep36642

Abstract

Lung injuries are common among those who suffer an impact or trauma. The relative severity of injuries up to physical tearing of tissue have been documented in clinical studies. However, the specific details of energy required to cause visible damage to the lung parenchyma are lacking. Furthermore,...

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Published in: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
Published: 2016
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa37124
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Abstract: Lung injuries are common among those who suffer an impact or trauma. The relative severity of injuries up to physical tearing of tissue have been documented in clinical studies. However, the specific details of energy required to cause visible damage to the lung parenchyma are lacking. Furthermore, the limitations of lung tissue under simple mechanical loading are also not well documented. This study aimed to collect mechanical test data from freshly excised lung, obtained from both Sprague-Dawley rats and New Zealand White rabbits. Compression and tension tests were conducted at three different strain rates: 0.25, 2.5 and 25 min−1. This study aimed to characterise the quasi-static behaviour of the bulk tissue prior to extending to higher rates. A nonlinear viscoelastic analytical model was applied to the data to describe their behaviour. Results exhibited asymmetry in terms of differences between tension and compression. The rabbit tissue also appeared to exhibit stronger viscous behaviour than the rat tissue. As a narrow strain rate band is explored here, no conclusions are being drawn currently regarding the rate sensitivity of rat tissue. However, this study does highlight both the clear differences between the two tissue types and the important role that composition and microstructure can play in mechanical response.
Keywords: biomedical engineering, tissues
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 1