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Modelling the damage and deformation process in a plastic bonded explosive microstructure under tension using the finite element method

Hari Arora Orcid Logo, E. Tarleton, J. Li-Mayer, M.N. Charalambides, D. Lewis

Computational Materials Science, Volume: 110, Pages: 91 - 101

Swansea University Author: Hari Arora Orcid Logo

Abstract

Modelling the deformation and failure processes occurring in polymer bonded explosives (PBX) and other energetic materials is of great importance for processing methods and lifetime storage purposes. Crystal debonding is undesirable since this can lead to contamination and a reduction in mechanical...

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Published in: Computational Materials Science
ISSN: 0927-0256
Published: 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa37130
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spelling 2020-08-14T13:05:54.0667167 v2 37130 2017-11-28 Modelling the damage and deformation process in a plastic bonded explosive microstructure under tension using the finite element method ed7371c768e9746008a6807f9f7a1555 0000-0002-9790-0907 Hari Arora Hari Arora true false 2017-11-28 MEDE Modelling the deformation and failure processes occurring in polymer bonded explosives (PBX) and other energetic materials is of great importance for processing methods and lifetime storage purposes. Crystal debonding is undesirable since this can lead to contamination and a reduction in mechanical properties. An insensitive high explosive (PBX-1) was the focus of the study. This binary particulate composite consists of (TATB) filler particles encapsulated in a polymeric binder (KELF800). The particle/matrix interface was characterised with a bi-linear cohesive law, the filler was treated as elastic and the matrix as visco-hyperelastic. Material parameters were determined experimentally for the binder and the cohesive parameters were obtained previously from Williamson et al. (2014) and Gee et al. (2007) for the interface. Once calibrated, the material laws were implemented in a finite element model to allow the macroscopic response of the composite to be simulated. A finite element mesh was generated using a SEM image to identify the filler particles which are represented as a set of 2D polygons. Simulated microstructures were also generated with the same size distribution and volume fraction only with the idealised assumption that the particles are a set of circles in 2D and spheres in 3D. The various model results were compared and a number of other variables were examined for their influence on the global deformation behaviour such as strain rate, cohesive parameters and contrast between filler and matrix modulus. The overwhelming outcome is that the geometry of the particles plays a crucial role in determining the onset of failure and the severity of fracture in relation to whether it is a purely local or global failure. The model was validated against a set of uniaxial tensile tests on PBX-1 and it was found that it predicted the initial modulus and failure stress and strain well. Journal Article Computational Materials Science 110 91 101 0927-0256 Particulate composites; High volume fraction; Finite element analysis; Micromechanics; Fracture; PBX and viscoelastic matrix composite 31 12 2015 2015-12-31 10.1016/j.commatsci.2015.08.004 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Engineering COLLEGE CODE MEDE Swansea University 2020-08-14T13:05:54.0667167 2017-11-28T13:59:49.0758754 Hari Arora 0000-0002-9790-0907 1 E. Tarleton 2 J. Li-Mayer 3 M.N. Charalambides 4 D. Lewis 5 0037130-27042018140858.pdf arora2015.pdf 2018-04-27T14:08:58.8900000 Output 4756413 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-04-27T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title Modelling the damage and deformation process in a plastic bonded explosive microstructure under tension using the finite element method
spellingShingle Modelling the damage and deformation process in a plastic bonded explosive microstructure under tension using the finite element method
Hari Arora
title_short Modelling the damage and deformation process in a plastic bonded explosive microstructure under tension using the finite element method
title_full Modelling the damage and deformation process in a plastic bonded explosive microstructure under tension using the finite element method
title_fullStr Modelling the damage and deformation process in a plastic bonded explosive microstructure under tension using the finite element method
title_full_unstemmed Modelling the damage and deformation process in a plastic bonded explosive microstructure under tension using the finite element method
title_sort Modelling the damage and deformation process in a plastic bonded explosive microstructure under tension using the finite element method
author_id_str_mv ed7371c768e9746008a6807f9f7a1555
author_id_fullname_str_mv ed7371c768e9746008a6807f9f7a1555_***_Hari Arora
author Hari Arora
author2 Hari Arora
E. Tarleton
J. Li-Mayer
M.N. Charalambides
D. Lewis
format Journal article
container_title Computational Materials Science
container_volume 110
container_start_page 91
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
issn 0927-0256
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.commatsci.2015.08.004
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Modelling the deformation and failure processes occurring in polymer bonded explosives (PBX) and other energetic materials is of great importance for processing methods and lifetime storage purposes. Crystal debonding is undesirable since this can lead to contamination and a reduction in mechanical properties. An insensitive high explosive (PBX-1) was the focus of the study. This binary particulate composite consists of (TATB) filler particles encapsulated in a polymeric binder (KELF800). The particle/matrix interface was characterised with a bi-linear cohesive law, the filler was treated as elastic and the matrix as visco-hyperelastic. Material parameters were determined experimentally for the binder and the cohesive parameters were obtained previously from Williamson et al. (2014) and Gee et al. (2007) for the interface. Once calibrated, the material laws were implemented in a finite element model to allow the macroscopic response of the composite to be simulated. A finite element mesh was generated using a SEM image to identify the filler particles which are represented as a set of 2D polygons. Simulated microstructures were also generated with the same size distribution and volume fraction only with the idealised assumption that the particles are a set of circles in 2D and spheres in 3D. The various model results were compared and a number of other variables were examined for their influence on the global deformation behaviour such as strain rate, cohesive parameters and contrast between filler and matrix modulus. The overwhelming outcome is that the geometry of the particles plays a crucial role in determining the onset of failure and the severity of fracture in relation to whether it is a purely local or global failure. The model was validated against a set of uniaxial tensile tests on PBX-1 and it was found that it predicted the initial modulus and failure stress and strain well.
published_date 2015-12-31T03:50:29Z
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score 10.898149