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Sandwich Panel Cores for Blast Applications: Materials and Graded Density / M. Kelly, H. Arora, A. Worley, M. Kaye, P. Del Linz, P. A. Hooper, J. P. Dear, Hari Arora

Experimental Mechanics, Volume: 56, Issue: 4, Pages: 523 - 544

Swansea University Author: Hari Arora

Abstract

Sandwich composites are of interest in marine applications due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and tailorable mechanical properties, but their resistance to air blast loading is not well understood. Full-scale 100 kg TNT equivalent air blast testing at a 15 m stand-off distance was performed...

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Published in: Experimental Mechanics
ISSN: 0014-4851 1741-2765
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa37131
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spelling 2017-11-28T14:05:29.3399318 v2 37131 2017-11-28 Sandwich Panel Cores for Blast Applications: Materials and Graded Density ed7371c768e9746008a6807f9f7a1555 0000-0002-9790-0907 Hari Arora Hari Arora true false 2017-11-28 MEDE Sandwich composites are of interest in marine applications due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and tailorable mechanical properties, but their resistance to air blast loading is not well understood. Full-scale 100 kg TNT equivalent air blast testing at a 15 m stand-off distance was performed on glass-fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) sandwich panels with polyvinyl chloride (PVC); polymethacrylimid (PMI); and styrene acrylonitrile (SAN) foam cores, all possessing the same thickness and density. Further testing was performed to assess the blast resistance of a sandwich panel containing a stepwise graded density SAN foam core, increasing in density away from the blast facing side. Finally a sandwich panel containing compliant polypropylene (PP) fibres within the GFRP front face-sheet, was subjected to blast loading with the intention of preventing front face-sheet cracking during blast. Measurements of the sandwich panel responses were made using high-speed digital image correlation (DIC), and post-blast damage was assessed by sectioning the sandwich panels and mapping the damage observed. It was concluded that all cores are effective in improving blast tolerance and that the SAN core was the most blast tolerant out of the three foam polymer types, with the DIC results showing a lower deflection measured during blast, and post-blast visual inspections showing less damage suffered. By grading the density of the core it was found that through thickness crack propagation was mitigated, as well as damage in the higher density foam layers, thus resulting in a smoother back face-sheet deflection profile. By incorporating compliant PP fibres into the front face-sheet, cracking was prevented in the GFRP, despite damage being present in the core and the interfaces between the core and face-sheets. Journal Article Experimental Mechanics 56 4 523 544 0014-4851 1741-2765 Graded density core, Foam core polymer type, Digital image correlation, Air blast loading, Compliant face-sheet 30 4 2016 2016-04-30 10.1007/s11340-015-0058-5 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Engineering COLLEGE CODE MEDE Swansea University 2017-11-28T14:05:29.3399318 2017-11-28T14:01:51.8367766 College of Engineering Engineering M. Kelly 1 H. Arora 2 A. Worley 3 M. Kaye 4 P. Del Linz 5 P. A. Hooper 6 J. P. Dear 7 Hari Arora 0000-0002-9790-0907 8 0037131-28112017140505.pdf kelly2015.pdf 2017-11-28T14:05:05.5170000 Output 25179099 application/pdf Version of Record true 2017-11-28T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title Sandwich Panel Cores for Blast Applications: Materials and Graded Density
spellingShingle Sandwich Panel Cores for Blast Applications: Materials and Graded Density
Hari, Arora
title_short Sandwich Panel Cores for Blast Applications: Materials and Graded Density
title_full Sandwich Panel Cores for Blast Applications: Materials and Graded Density
title_fullStr Sandwich Panel Cores for Blast Applications: Materials and Graded Density
title_full_unstemmed Sandwich Panel Cores for Blast Applications: Materials and Graded Density
title_sort Sandwich Panel Cores for Blast Applications: Materials and Graded Density
author_id_str_mv ed7371c768e9746008a6807f9f7a1555
author_id_fullname_str_mv ed7371c768e9746008a6807f9f7a1555_***_Hari, Arora
author Hari, Arora
author2 M. Kelly
H. Arora
A. Worley
M. Kaye
P. Del Linz
P. A. Hooper
J. P. Dear
Hari Arora
format Journal article
container_title Experimental Mechanics
container_volume 56
container_issue 4
container_start_page 523
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
issn 0014-4851
1741-2765
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s11340-015-0058-5
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
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description Sandwich composites are of interest in marine applications due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and tailorable mechanical properties, but their resistance to air blast loading is not well understood. Full-scale 100 kg TNT equivalent air blast testing at a 15 m stand-off distance was performed on glass-fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) sandwich panels with polyvinyl chloride (PVC); polymethacrylimid (PMI); and styrene acrylonitrile (SAN) foam cores, all possessing the same thickness and density. Further testing was performed to assess the blast resistance of a sandwich panel containing a stepwise graded density SAN foam core, increasing in density away from the blast facing side. Finally a sandwich panel containing compliant polypropylene (PP) fibres within the GFRP front face-sheet, was subjected to blast loading with the intention of preventing front face-sheet cracking during blast. Measurements of the sandwich panel responses were made using high-speed digital image correlation (DIC), and post-blast damage was assessed by sectioning the sandwich panels and mapping the damage observed. It was concluded that all cores are effective in improving blast tolerance and that the SAN core was the most blast tolerant out of the three foam polymer types, with the DIC results showing a lower deflection measured during blast, and post-blast visual inspections showing less damage suffered. By grading the density of the core it was found that through thickness crack propagation was mitigated, as well as damage in the higher density foam layers, thus resulting in a smoother back face-sheet deflection profile. By incorporating compliant PP fibres into the front face-sheet, cracking was prevented in the GFRP, despite damage being present in the core and the interfaces between the core and face-sheets.
published_date 2016-04-30T03:52:12Z
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